5. GENDER EQUALITY

How Tina Turner ‘broke the silence’ on domestic abuse

How Tina Turner ‘broke the silence’ on domestic abuse
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

How Tina Turner ‘broke the silence’ on domestic abuse  BBC.com

How Tina Turner ‘broke the silence’ on domestic abuse

When Tina Turner Spoke Out: A Story of Bravery and Resilience

By Helen Bushby, Entertainment Reporter

This article contains descriptions of domestic violence which some readers may find distressing.

Ike and Tina Turner in 1971

Image source: Getty Images

When Tina Turner first spoke out about the violence she endured during her marriage to Ike Turner, it was an act of bravery to expose herself so publicly.

“I was insanely afraid of that man,” she told People magazine in 1981, revealing the painful reality behind the hugely successful musical duo.

Tina’s scorching description of their marriage included being made to watch a live sex show in a brothel on their wedding night, and being beaten with a shoe stretcher while she was pregnant.

She also spoke about Ike throwing scalding coffee at her, and of being brutalised with a coat hanger. In 1968, she tried to take her own life.

“I was afraid to put it out [talk about the abuse] because of what I would get from Ike,” she told journalist Carl Arrington.

Ike Turner, who died in 2007, always denied his ex-wife’s claims that he abused her, and expressed frustration that he had been demonised in the media.

Ike and Tina Turner at the Hammersmith Odeon in London in 1975

Image source: Getty Images

The couple met when Tina was just 17, after she saw his group Kings of Rhythm perform, and asked him to hear her sing.

Not surprisingly, he spotted her star quality, making her his lead singer, choosing her stage name and lavishing her with clothes and jewellery.

They married in 1962, and Tina, who had already experienced the pain of being rejected as a child by her mother, promised Ike she “wouldn’t leave him” – something she later came to regret.

“I felt obligated to stay there and I was afraid,” she told Arrington. “I didn’t want to hurt him, and after he beat me up… I was sitting there all bruised and torn, and all of a sudden I’m feeling sorry for him.

“Maybe I was brainwashed.”

But by 1978, after a string of hits including River Deep, Mountain High, Tina decided she felt able to leave Ike. She could no longer put up with the “torture” of being married to him, and the impact it had on their four sons.

“I was living a life of death. I didn’t exist,” she said. “But I survived it. And when I walked out, I walked. And I didn’t look back.”

Tina Turner in 1981

Image source: Getty Images

Tina moved away, and had to rebuild her career, making money by singing in Las Vegas and appearing on various TV shows.

She decided to tell all in the 1981 interview, to expel some of the ghosts from her past.

In Daniel Lindsay and TJ Martin’s 2021 documentary Tina, the singer said she was so nervous about doing the interview that she asked her psychic if it would ruin her career.

“She said, ‘No, Tina’,” the singer recalled. “‘It’s going to do just the opposite. It’s going to break everything wide open.’

Tina Turner in 1985

Image source: Getty Images

Dr Lenore E Walker, director of the US-based Domestic Violence Institute, which provides support for victims of domestic abuse, thinks Tina’s decision to speak out was hugely important.

“In 1981 we were just learning about the extent of domestic violence in homes,” she tells the BBC. “It was often thought to be only poor women without resources who were abused.

“When Tina Turner spoke out about her life, it brought awareness to the fact that domestic violence was everywhere.”

She says Tina helped give credence to other women daring to speak out about abuse.

“Women were not believed when they spoke out about domestic violence, so when Tina Turner, a well-respected and famous singer, spoke out, it gave other women the courage to do so, also,” she explains.

“We needed ‘influencers’ such as Tina Turner to speak out about domestic violence, so that my work on battered woman syndrome was introduced in the courts, and juries began to believe women acted to protect themselves and their

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators Analysis

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

  • SDG 5: Gender Equality
  • SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions

The article discusses domestic violence and the importance of Tina Turner speaking out about her experiences. Domestic violence is a violation of human rights and a form of gender-based violence, which aligns with SDG 5 on Gender Equality. Additionally, the article mentions the impact of Tina Turner’s story on raising awareness about domestic violence, which relates to SDG 16 on Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions.

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

  • Target 5.2: Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in public and private spheres
  • Target 16.1: Significantly reduce all forms of violence and related death rates everywhere

The article emphasizes the need to address domestic violence and eliminate all forms of violence against women. This aligns with Target 5.2 under SDG 5. Additionally, the article highlights the importance of raising awareness about domestic violence and reducing violence rates, which corresponds to Target 16.1 under SDG 16.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

  • Indicator 5.2.1: Proportion of ever-partnered women and girls subjected to physical, sexual, or psychological violence by a current or former intimate partner in the previous 12 months
  • Indicator 16.1.1: Number of victims of intentional homicide per 100,000 population, by sex and age

The article mentions Tina Turner’s experiences of physical and psychological violence by her former partner, which can be used as an indicator for measuring progress towards Target 5.2. The article also discusses the impact of domestic violence on women’s lives, which can be measured using Indicator 16.1.1 to track the number of victims of intentional homicide.

Table: SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 5: Gender Equality Target 5.2: Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in public and private spheres Indicator 5.2.1: Proportion of ever-partnered women and girls subjected to physical, sexual, or psychological violence by a current or former intimate partner in the previous 12 months
SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions Target 16.1: Significantly reduce all forms of violence and related death rates everywhere Indicator 16.1.1: Number of victims of intentional homicide per 100,000 population, by sex and age

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: bbc.com

 

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