7. AFFORDABLE AND CLEAN ENERGY

Discover Clean Energy Careers With Roadtrip Nation

Discover Clean Energy Careers With Roadtrip Nation
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

Discover Clean Energy Careers With Roadtrip Nation – NYSERDA  NYSERDA

Discover Clean Energy Careers With Roadtrip Nation

Three New Yorkers Traverse the State to Explore Jobs Fueling the Clean Energy Transition

New York’s clean energy investments and ambitious climate goals are creating thousands of new jobs in fields like offshore wind, green buildings, and alternative transportation.

A new documentary series, Empowered State Link opens in new window - close new window to return to this page., dives into the diverse and rewarding career opportunities within New York’s growing clean energy economy at this pivotal moment in addressing the climate crisis. The four-part docuseries, which was created by Roadtrip Nation, follows three young adults – Leila Tevlin, David Yang, and Julia Dworetzky – on their 975-mile, three-week journey across New York to explore the many facets of the clean energy transition in their home state and meet the people making it happen.

From Niagara Falls to Long Island, the trio meets with leaders and experts to discuss their career trajectories, motivations for working in sustainability, and the day-to-day of advancing clean energy technologies, investment, and policies in New York. These conversations also delve into fundamental questions about getting started in a clean energy career, building a more diverse and inclusive clean energy economy, and maintaining an optimistic outlook amid the current and looming threats of climate change.

“Not only did it give me hope meeting all these incredibly passionate and talented people working to achieve their vision of sustainability, but I left the road trip feeling better about the many different career paths that are available.”

– David Yang, roadtripper and recent Columbia University graduate

Watch the Docuseries

How You Can Help Power New York’s Clean Energy Future

New York’s clean energy economy is bringing jobs and investment to all corners of the Empire State. Whether you’re entering the workforce for the first time or considering a career change, the clean energy industry has opportunities for everyone.

New York’s clean energy workforce has experienced steady growth – nearly 25,000 jobs were added from 2015 to 2021, representing a 17% increase across the industry. However, the coming decade will bring exponential growth in clean energy employment, with around half-a-million New Yorkers expected to be working in clean energy by 2030. As a leader in climate action and clean energy development, New York’s economy will also generate technologies, equipment, and solutions to advance the clean energy transition in other regions of the U.S. and abroad.

A skilled clean energy workforce, spanning manufacturing, installation, and professional services, is needed to shift New York’s buildings, transportation system, and power generation from fossil fuels to renewable and low-carbon energy sources. Recognizing that communities on the frontlines of the climate crisis have been disproportionately impacted by energy costs, pollution, and barriers to employment, NYSERDA is expanding investment in workforce development and training for clean energy jobs, especially for New Yorkers in Disadvantaged Communities.

There are a variety of pathways to a clean energy career. Below are some opportunities for New Yorkers interested in helping power the clean energy future.

Clean Energy Internship Program

Current students, recent graduates, veterans, and other priority populations in New York can get hands-on experience and explore their professional interests while getting paid through New York State’s Clean Energy Internship Program.

The program has a wide range of participating employers that are working to combat climate change and expand the use of clean energy technologies like solar, electric vehicles, and heat pumps.

Learn More

Climate Justice Fellowship

NYSERDA is funding paid fellowships at community-based organizations, clean energy businesses, climate tech companies, and other employers advancing climate justice and clean energy in New York’s Disadvantaged Communities. The year-long Climate Justice Fellowship includes training and professional development opportunities to further prepare fellows for a career in clean energy and climate.

Learn More

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators in the Article

  1. SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy

    • Target 7.2: Increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix.
    • Indicator 7.2.1: Renewable energy share in the total final energy consumption.
  2. SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth

    • Target 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value.
    • Indicator 8.5.1: Average hourly earnings of female and male employees, by occupation, age, and persons with disabilities.
  3. SDG 13: Climate Action

    • Target 13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies, and planning.
    • Indicator 13.2.1: Number of countries that have communicated the strengthening of institutional, systemic, and individual capacity-building to implement adaptation, mitigation, and technology transfer.
  4. SDG 9: Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure

    • Target 9.4: By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes.
    • Indicator 9.4.1: CO2 emission per unit of value added.
  5. SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities

    • Target 11.6: By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management.
    • Indicator 11.6.1: Proportion of urban solid waste regularly collected and with adequate final discharge out of total urban solid waste generated, by cities.

Analysis:

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

The issues highlighted in the article are connected to the following SDGs:

  • SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy
  • SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
  • SDG 13: Climate Action
  • SDG 9: Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure
  • SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

The specific targets identified based on the article’s content are:

  • Target 7.2: Increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix.
  • Target 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value.
  • Target 13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies, and planning.
  • Target 9.4: By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes.
  • Target 11.6: By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

Yes, there are indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets:

  • Indicator 7.2.1: Renewable energy share in the total final energy consumption.
  • Indicator 8.5.1: Average hourly earnings of female and male employees, by occupation, age, and persons with disabilities.
  • Indicator 13.2.1: Number of countries that have communicated the strengthening of institutional, systemic, and individual capacity-building to implement adaptation, mitigation, and technology transfer.
  • Indicator 9.4.1: CO2 emission per unit of value added.
  • Indicator 11.6.1: Proportion of urban solid waste regularly collected and with adequate final discharge out of total urban solid waste generated, by cities.

Table: SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy Target 7.2: Increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix. Indicator 7.2.1: Renewable energy share in the total final energy consumption.
SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth Target 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value. Indicator 8.5.1: Average hourly earnings of female and male employees, by occupation, age, and persons with disabilities.
SDG 13: Climate Action Target 13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies, and planning. Indicator 13.2.1: Number of countries that have communicated the strengthening of institutional, systemic, and individual capacity-building to implement adaptation, mitigation, and technology transfer.
SDG 9: Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure Target 9.4: By 203

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: nyserda.ny.gov

 

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