3. GOOD HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

HIV/AIDS epidemic hits Long Island Black and Latino communities hardest

HIV/AIDS epidemic hits Long Island Black and Latino communities hardest
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

HIV/AIDS epidemic hits Long Island Black and Latino communities hardest  Newsday

HIV/AIDS epidemic hits Long Island Black and Latino communities hardest

New HIV Cases and AIDS-related Deaths Disproportionately Affect Black and Latino Communities

According to data from the New York State Department of Health, the HIV epidemic continues to impact Black and Latino communities on Long Island and nationwide at a significantly higher rate than white and Asian communities. The data shows that a Black Long Islander is seven times more likely to be diagnosed with HIV compared to a white resident, while a Latino resident is three times more likely. Similar disparities exist at the state and national levels.

Factors Contributing to Disparities

Experts attribute these disparities to a combination of factors, including higher rates of poverty, housing insecurity, incarceration, and limited access to healthcare. Distrust of the healthcare system and the societal stigma associated with HIV also play a role. These factors contribute to two distinct epidemics: one affecting Black and Latino communities and another affecting other Americans.

Impact of HIV/AIDS

Despite significant progress in reducing new HIV cases and AIDS-related deaths, thousands of people still die from HIV-related causes every year. Studies have shown that people with HIV are more susceptible to other medical conditions such as lung disease, stroke, diabetes, and dementia.

Racial Disparities

Black communities have been disproportionately affected by HIV since the 1980s. However, it wasn’t until 20 years after the epidemic started that Black communities became a priority, widening the racial gap. In 2019, more than 40% of Americans with HIV were Black, despite Black individuals making up only 13% of the U.S. population. The racial gap is even greater for women, with 54% of women diagnosed with HIV in 2019 being Black.

Disparities on Long Island

On Long Island, the rates of HIV among Black and Latino residents are significantly higher compared to white and Asian residents. In 2021, the rate of HIV among Black residents was 631 diagnosed cases per 100,000 people, while the rate among Latinos was 283 cases. In comparison, the rates for white people and Asians were 95 and 70 cases, respectively.

Barriers to Treatment and Prevention

One of the reasons for the drop in new HIV cases is the availability of powerful drugs that block transmission. However, Black and Latino individuals at higher risk for HIV are less likely to be prescribed these medications due to various barriers, including limited access. Additionally, once diagnosed with HIV, they are less likely to take post-infection medicines that can reduce the level of the virus in their bodies to undetectable levels, preventing transmission to others.

Efforts to Address Disparities

Healthcare providers and organizations on Long Island are focusing their efforts on reducing HIV transmission and improving access to care in Black and Latino communities. These efforts include targeted prevention outreach, education, and training programs. However, challenges remain in reaching these communities due to factors such as language barriers, cultural differences, and stigma.

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

  1. Goal 3: Good Health and Well-being – Addressing HIV disparities aligns with SDG 3’s target of ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030.
  2. Goal 5: Gender Equality – Addressing the racial gap in HIV rates among women supports SDG 5’s aim of achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls.
  3. Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities – Efforts to reduce HIV disparities contribute to SDG 10’s objective of reducing inequalities within and among countries.
  4. Goal 17: Partnerships for the Goals – Collaborative efforts between healthcare providers, organizations, and communities are essential to achieving SDG 17’s target of strengthening global partnerships for sustainable development.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Target 3.3: By 2030, end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, and neglected tropical diseases Indicator: HIV prevalence rates among different racial and ethnic groups
SDG 5: Gender Equality Target 5.3: Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early, and forced marriage and female genital mutilation Indicator: HIV prevalence rates among women, specifically Black women
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities Target 10.3: Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome Indicator: Disparities in HIV diagnosis rates among different racial and ethnic groups
SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions Target 16.3: Promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and ensure equal access to justice for all Indicator: Distrust of the health care system and HIV-related stigma

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

The SDGs that are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article are SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being, SDG 5: Gender Equality, SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities, and SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions.

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

Based on the article’s content, the specific targets that can be identified are:

– Target 3.3: By 2030, end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, and neglected tropical diseases.

– Target 5.3: Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early, and forced marriage and female genital mutilation.

– Target 10.3: Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome.

– Target 16.3: Promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and ensure equal access to justice for all.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

Yes, there are indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets. These indicators include:

– HIV prevalence rates among different racial and ethnic groups.

– HIV prevalence rates among women, specifically Black women.

– Disparities in HIV diagnosis rates among different racial and ethnic groups.

– Distrust of the health care system and HIV-related stigma.

These indicators can be used to track progress in ending the epidemics of AIDS, reducing inequalities in HIV diagnosis rates, promoting gender equality in HIV prevention and treatment, and addressing issues of distrust and stigma in the health care system.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Target 3.3: By 2030, end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, and neglected tropical diseases Indicator: HIV prevalence rates among different racial and ethnic groups
SDG 5: Gender Equality Target 5.3: Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early, and forced marriage and female genital mutilation Indicator: HIV prevalence rates among women, specifically Black women
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities Target 10.3: Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome Indicator: Disparities in HIV diagnosis rates among different racial and ethnic groups
SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions Target 16.3: Promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and ensure equal access to justice for all Indicator: Distrust of the health care system and HIV-related stigma

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: newsday.com

 

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