11. SUSTAINABLE CITIES AND COMMUNITIES

Climate crisis poses greatest risk to people with respiratory illnesses, experts warn

Climate crisis poses greatest risk to people with respiratory illnesses, experts warn
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

Climate crisis poses greatest risk to people with respiratory illnesses, experts warn  The Guardian

Climate crisis poses greatest risk to people with respiratory illnesses, experts warn

The Climate Crisis and its Impact on Respiratory Health

The climate crisis may pose the greatest risks to people with respiratory illnesses, with high temperatures and changing weather patterns exacerbating lung health problems, experts have said.

EU Urged to Lower Air Pollution Limits

Respiratory experts have called on the European Union (EU) to lower its regulatory limits for air pollution in line with the World Health Organization (WHO). In a European Respiratory Journal editorial, they emphasized the need to alleviate patients’ suffering.

Interlinking of Climate Emergency and Human Health

The impact of the climate emergency on human health has become irreversible and interconnected. The authors of a peer-reviewed paper highlighted that an increase in pollen, allergens, wildfires, dust storms, and fossil fuel-based traffic worsen existing respiratory conditions or create new ones.

Air Pollution and its Devastating Consequences

Air pollution, which shares many sources with greenhouse gas emissions, is estimated to have caused 6.7 million deaths globally in 2019 and 373,000 deaths in Europe. The authors stressed the vulnerability of respiratory patients to climate change and its potential to worsen their symptoms, leading to fatal outcomes.

Children’s Vulnerability to Climate Crisis and Air Pollution

Children are particularly affected by the climate crisis and air pollution due to their developing lungs, faster breathing rate, and increased time spent outdoors. Early exposure to air pollution can increase the likelihood of developing chronic lung diseases later in life.

The Benefits of Cutting Greenhouse Gas Emissions

The authors emphasized that reducing greenhouse gas emissions and halting further planetary heating would lead to substantial and immediate health benefits. Cleaner air would result in improved respiratory health for individuals.

Action Needed from Policymakers

The authors called for action from policymakers to mitigate the impacts of climate change on both the planet and human health. They emphasized the importance of respiratory doctors and nurses being aware of these new risks and working towards alleviating patients’ suffering.

Regulating Air Pollution as Part of Climate Strategies

Recent reports from the World Health Organization have highlighted the importance of reducing emissions for better air quality. The authors stressed that regulating air pollution should be at the core of any climate strategy.

EU Air Quality Standards and WHO Guidelines

The authors, representing the European Respiratory Society, urged the EU to align its air quality standards with the WHO guidelines. Currently, the EU’s limits for fine particles (PM2.5) and nitrogen dioxide are higher than the WHO’s recommended limits.

Preparing for the Future

As extreme weather events become more frequent, the authors emphasized the need to prepare communities for the increasing impact of climate-related respiratory diseases. Adapting to these challenges is crucial for safeguarding respiratory health.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Target 3.9: By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water, and soil pollution and contamination Indicator 3.9.1: Mortality rate attributed to household and ambient air pollution
SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities Target 11.6: By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management Indicator 11.6.2: Annual mean levels of fine particulate matter (e.g. PM2.5 and PM10) in cities (population-weighted)
SDG 13: Climate Action Target 13.1: Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries Indicator 13.1.1: Number of deaths, missing persons, and directly affected persons attributed to disasters per 100,000 population

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being

The article discusses the impact of climate change on respiratory health, emphasizing the vulnerability of individuals with respiratory illnesses. This aligns with SDG 3, which aims to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages.

SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities

The article mentions the need to regulate air pollution and improve air quality, particularly in cities. This relates to SDG 11, which focuses on creating sustainable cities and communities.

SDG 13: Climate Action

The article highlights the interconnection between the climate emergency and human health, emphasizing the need to mitigate the impacts of climate change. This aligns with SDG 13, which aims to take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

Target 3.9: By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water, and soil pollution and contamination

The article emphasizes the need to lower regulatory limits for air pollution to alleviate patients’ suffering and improve respiratory health.

Target 11.6: By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management

The article calls for action to improve air quality in cities, particularly by reducing air pollution.

Target 13.1: Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries

The article highlights the vulnerability of respiratory patients to the changing climate and emphasizes the need to take action to mitigate the impacts of climate change on health.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

Indicator 3.9.1: Mortality rate attributed to household and ambient air pollution

The article mentions the impact of air pollution on respiratory health and the need to reduce deaths and illnesses caused by hazardous chemicals and air pollution.

Indicator 11.6.2: Annual mean levels of fine particulate matter (e.g. PM2.5 and PM10) in cities (population-weighted)

The article discusses the need to regulate air pollution in cities, particularly fine particulate matter, which can have adverse effects on respiratory health.

Indicator 13.1.1: Number of deaths, missing persons, and directly affected persons attributed to disasters per 100,000 population

The article highlights the vulnerability of respiratory patients to climate-related hazards and natural disasters, indicating the need to strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity.

Overall, the article provides information and context relevant to measuring progress towards the identified targets under SDGs 3, 11, and 13.

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: theguardian.com

 

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