3. GOOD HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

Study Blames Western Diet, Excessive Alcohol Use for Cancer Surge in Young People

Study Blames Western Diet, Excessive Alcohol Use for Cancer Surge in Young People
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

Study Blames Western Diet, Excessive Alcohol Use for Cancer Surge in Young People  Yahoo Life

Study Blames Western Diet, Excessive Alcohol Use for Cancer Surge in Young People

Cancer Rates Among People Under 50 Increase Due to Westernized Diets

A new study has found that cancer rates among people under the age of 50 have significantly increased over the past three decades. The study suggests that the main risk factors for this rise are “westernized” diets, which are high in red meat and sodium, and low in fruits and vegetables. These risk factors are further exacerbated by alcohol consumption and tobacco use.

The study, published by BMJ Oncology, analyzed data from 204 countries and 29 types of cancer. It found that global cases of early onset cancer in people under 50 increased by 79 percent from 1.82 million in 1990 to 3.26 million in 2019. Additionally, global cancer deaths rose by 27 percent to 1.06 million in 2019.

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

  • SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being
  • SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

The researchers identified diet, alcohol and tobacco use, physical inactivity, excess weight, and high blood sugar as the leading risk factors for cancer. While genetic factors also play a role in cancer diagnoses, the study emphasizes the impact of lifestyle choices on cancer rates.

“Changes in diet, lifestyle, and environment since the turn of the 20th century, resulting in increased rates of obesity, physical inactivity, westernized diets, and environmental pollution, may have affected the incidence of early-onset cancer,” wrote the authors of the study. “Additionally, alcohol, smoking, and detrimental pregnancy exposures may have also affected the incidence of early-onset cancer.”

Breast cancer had the highest incidence of both cases and deaths, with rates of 13.7 and 3.5 per every 100,000 of the global population respectively. Windpipe, lung, stomach, and bowel cancers were also linked to high death tolls. The sharpest spike in deaths was observed among those with kidney or ovarian cancer.

In 2019, North America, Oceania, and western Europe had the highest rates of early onset cancers. Low- to middle-income countries in Oceania, eastern Europe, and central Asia recorded the highest death rates.

Projected Increase in Cases and Deaths

  1. By 2030, the global number of cancer cases is projected to increase by 31 percent.
  2. The global number of cancer deaths is projected to increase by 21 percent by 2030.
  3. People in the 40–44 and 45–49 age groups are at the highest risk.

The study concludes that early-onset cancer morbidity continues to increase worldwide, with variations in mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) between areas, countries, sex, and cancer types. Encouraging a healthy lifestyle could reduce the burden of early-onset cancer.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being 3.4: By 2030, reduce by one-third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being – Increase in cancer rates among people under the age of 50
– Increase in global cases of early onset cancer
– Increase in global cancer deaths
SDG 2: Zero Hunger 2.2: By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women, and older persons – “Westernized” diets high in red meat and sodium, and low in fruits and vegetables as risk factors for cancer
SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production 12.8: By 2030, ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature – “Westernized” diets as a risk factor for cancer
SDG 13: Climate Action 13.3: Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning – Environmental pollution as a risk factor for cancer
SDG 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions 16.1: Significantly reduce all forms of violence and related death rates everywhere – Alcohol and tobacco use as risk factors for cancer

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

The SDGs that are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article are SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being, SDG 2: Zero Hunger, SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production, SDG 13: Climate Action, and SDG 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions.

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

– Under SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being, the specific target is to reduce premature mortality from non-communicable diseases, including cancer.

– Under SDG 2: Zero Hunger, the specific target is to end all forms of malnutrition and address nutritional needs.

– Under SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production, the specific target is to ensure relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles.

– Under SDG 13: Climate Action, the specific target is to improve education and awareness on environmental pollution.

– Under SDG 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions, the specific target is to reduce violence and related death rates.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

Yes, there are indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets:

– Increase in cancer rates among people under the age of 50

– Increase in global cases of early onset cancer

– Increase in global cancer deaths

– “Westernized” diets high in red meat and sodium, and low in fruits and vegetables as risk factors for cancer

– Environmental pollution as a risk factor for cancer

– Alcohol and tobacco use as risk factors for cancer

These indicators can be used to measure progress towards reducing premature mortality from non-communicable diseases, ending malnutrition, promoting sustainable development and lifestyles, improving education and awareness on environmental pollution, and reducing violence and related death rates.

4. Table: SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being 3.4: By 2030, reduce by one-third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being – Increase in cancer rates among people under the age of 50
– Increase in global cases of early onset cancer
– Increase in global cancer deaths
SDG 2: Zero Hunger 2.2: By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women, and older persons – “Westernized” diets high in red meat and sodium, and low in fruits and vegetables as risk factors for cancer
SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production 12.8: By 2030, ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature – “Westernized” diets as a risk factor for cancer
SDG 13: Climate Action 13.3: Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning – Environmental pollution as a risk factor for cancer
SDG 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions 16.1: Significantly reduce all forms of violence and related death rates everywhere – Alcohol and tobacco use as risk factors for cancer

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: yahoo.com

 

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