8. DECENT WORK AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

Minnesota meat processor fined $300K to settle child labor allegations

Minnesota meat processor fined 0K to settle child labor allegations
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

Minnesota meat processor fined $300K to settle child labor allegations  Star Tribune

Southern Minnesota Meat Processor Fined for Employing Minors in Hazardous Work

Minnesota meat processor fined $300K to settle child labor allegations

A southern Minnesota meat processor accused of employing eight teenagers in illegal, hazardous work — including operating a meat grinder and forklifts on the graveyard shift — will pay $300,000 in an administrative fine, according to a Watonwan County judge’s consent order issued Friday.

SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth

In the consent order, Tony Downs Foods, which produces an array of fully cooked and frozen protein meals, said it disagreed with the allegations first raised by the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) in March.

But the company agreed to pay the fine and comply with other stipulations, including hiring a third-party watchdog and communicating labor policies to employees in both English and Spanish.

Employing minors in such environments violates the state’s child labor laws. The Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry completed an overnight inspection of the plant in January when it discovered the underage workers.

The consent order, issued by Watonwan County Judge Stephen Ferrazzano II and signed by Tony Downs President Mike Downs, said the company has “fully cooperated” with investigators with DLI.

“The consequences of child labor violations are substantial and the Department of Labor and Industry is committed to combating these violations,” DLI Commissioner Nicole Blissenbach said in a statement.

In a statement issued by David Ross, vice president of human resources, the company maintained the consent order is not an admission of guilt.

“We believe that the administrative penalty included in the settlement was grossly disproportionate, not supported under the law, and an attempt by the DLI to make our family-owned company an example for a serious issue that is pervasive among employers in the food sector and many other industries across the U.S.,” the statement said.

SDG 4: Quality Education

A rash of child labor employment — and subsequent federal and state investigations — has rippled across meatpacking plants in the U.S., including in Minnesota. Last year, federal investigators with the U.S. Department of Labor unearthed dozens of children working for a janitorial service in meatpacking plants in Worthington and Marshall.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth Target 8.7: Take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labor, end modern slavery and human trafficking, and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labor, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labor in all its forms. Indicator 8.7.1: Proportion and number of children aged 5-17 years engaged in child labor, by sex and age group (in accordance with the International Labour Organization definition of child labor).
SDG 4: Quality Education Target 4.4: By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs, and entrepreneurship. No specific indicators mentioned in the article.

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

  • SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
  • SDG 4: Quality Education

The issues highlighted in the article are related to child labor and the violation of labor laws in a meat processing plant. SDG 8 focuses on promoting decent work and economic growth, which includes eradicating forced labor, ending child labor, and ensuring safe working conditions. SDG 4 aims to provide quality education, which is crucial in preventing child labor and equipping youth with relevant skills for decent employment.

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

  • Target 8.7: Take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labor, end modern slavery and human trafficking, and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labor, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labor in all its forms.
  • Target 4.4: By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs, and entrepreneurship.

The article highlights the employment of underage workers in hazardous conditions, which is a violation of child labor laws. Target 8.7 specifically addresses the need to eradicate child labor and ensure the prohibition of its worst forms. Target 4.4 emphasizes the importance of providing relevant skills to youth for decent employment, which can help prevent child labor.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

  • Indicator 8.7.1: Proportion and number of children aged 5-17 years engaged in child labor, by sex and age group (in accordance with the International Labour Organization definition of child labor).

The article does not explicitly mention any indicators related to Target 4.4. However, Indicator 8.7.1 can be used to measure progress towards Target 8.7. This indicator focuses on tracking the proportion and number of children engaged in child labor, which aligns with the issue discussed in the article.

4. SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth Target 8.7: Take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labor, end modern slavery and human trafficking, and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labor, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labor in all its forms. Indicator 8.7.1: Proportion and number of children aged 5-17 years engaged in child labor, by sex and age group (in accordance with the International Labour Organization definition of child labor).
SDG 4: Quality Education Target 4.4: By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs, and entrepreneurship. No specific indicators mentioned in the article.

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: startribune.com

 

Report reveals high number of child worker deaths in Turkey

Join us, as fellow seekers of change, on a transformative journey at https://sdgtalks.ai/welcome, where you can become a member and actively contribute to shaping a brighter future.

 

About the author

ZJbTFBGJ2T