3. GOOD HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

Factors Associated with Teenage Pregnancy in Somaliland | IJWH

Factors Associated with Teenage Pregnancy in Somaliland | IJWH
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

Factors Associated with Teenage Pregnancy in Somaliland | IJWH  Dove Medical Press

Factors Associated with Teenage Pregnancy in Somaliland | IJWH

Introduction

Teenage pregnancy is a global issue, particularly prevalent in developing countries, and is associated with various health, social, and economic consequences. In Somaliland, a region in East Africa, teenage pregnancy is a common occurrence, but there has been no study conducted on this subject. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the magnitude and factors associated with teenage pregnancy in Somaliland using data from the 2020 Somaliland Health and Demographic Survey (SLHDS).

Methods

Study Area

The study was conducted in Somaliland, a region in East Africa. It has six geopolitical regions and an estimated population of 4.2 million people. The study used data from the 2020 SLHDS, which is a nationally representative survey.

Sample Size and Sampling

A total of 3,786 women in reproductive age groups were included in the study. The survey used a two-level cluster sampling design, with initial selection of enumeration areas followed by selection of households. The sample included participants from urban, rural, and nomadic areas.

Variables

The outcome variable was teenage pregnancy, defined as pregnancy occurring in the age range of 10-19 years. Explanatory variables included sociodemographic factors such as residence, region, educational level, age, wealth quintiles, and access to technology.

Data Analysis

Data analysis was conducted using SPSS version 24 software. Descriptive statistics were computed, and binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with teenage pregnancy.

Results

The magnitude of teenage pregnancy in Somaliland was found to be 47.2%. Factors significantly associated with teenage pregnancy included being a nomadic resident, being in the lowest wealth quintiles, being in the Sanaag region, and having lower educational attainment.

Discussion

The high prevalence of teenage pregnancy in Somaliland is consistent with other studies conducted in similar settings. Factors such as low educational attainment, lower socioeconomic status, and regional differences were found to be associated with teenage pregnancy. These findings highlight the need for educational and financial empowerment programs targeting women, particularly those in nomadic communities.

Conclusion and Recommendations

Teenage pregnancy is a significant issue in Somaliland, and it is associated with various socioeconomic factors. To address this issue, it is recommended that governmental and non-governmental organizations focus on educating and financially empowering women, with particular attention to nomadic communities. Further research is also needed to gain a deeper understanding of the driving factors behind teenage pregnancy in Somaliland.

References

  1. Ganchimeg T, Ota E, Morisaki N, et al. Pregnancy and childbirth outcomes among adolescent mothers: a World Health Organization multicountry study. BJOG. 2014;121:40–48.
  2. Worku MG, Tessema ZT, Teshale AB, Tesema GA, Yeshaw Y. Prevalence and associated factors of adolescent pregnancy (15–19 years) in East Africa: a multilevel analysis. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2021;21:1–8.
  3. World Health Organization. WHO Guidelines on Preventing Early Pregnancy and Poor Reproductive Health Outcomes Among Adolescents in Developing Countries. World Health Organization; 2011.
  4. Govender D, Taylor M, Naidoo S. Adolescent pregnancy and parenting: perceptions of healthcare providers. J Multidiscip Healthc. 2020;1607–1628.
  5. Asmamaw DB, Tafere TZ, Negash WD. Prevalence of teenage pregnancy and its associated factors in high fertility sub-Saharan Africa countries: a multilevel analysis. BMC Womens Health. 2023;23(1):1–10.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Target 3.7: By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programs Indicator 3.7.1: Proportion of women of reproductive age (aged 15-49 years) who have their need for family planning satisfied with modern methods
SDG 4: Quality Education Target 4.1: By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable, and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and effective learning outcomes Indicator 4.1.1: Proportion of children and young people (a) in grades 2/3; (b) at the end of primary; and (c) at the end of lower secondary achieving at least a minimum proficiency level in (i) reading and (ii) mathematics, by sex
SDG 5: Gender Equality Target 5.3: Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early, and forced marriage and female genital mutilation Indicator 5.3.1: Proportion of women aged 20-24 years who were married or in a union before age 15 and before age 18
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion, or economic or other status Indicator 10.2.1: Proportion of people living below 50 percent of median income, by age, sex, and persons with disabilities

Analysis

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

The issues highlighted in the article are connected to the following SDGs:

– SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being

– SDG 4: Quality Education

– SDG 5: Gender Equality

– SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

Based on the article’s content, the specific targets under the identified SDGs are:

– Target 3.7: Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services

– Target 4.1: Ensure all girls and boys complete free, equitable, and quality education

– Target 5.3: Eliminate child, early, and forced marriage

– Target 10.2: Empower and promote social, economic, and political inclusion

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

Yes, there are indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets:

– Indicator 3.7.1: Proportion of women of reproductive age who have their need for family planning satisfied with modern methods

– Indicator 4.1.1: Proportion of children and young people achieving at least a minimum proficiency level in reading and mathematics

– Indicator 5.3.1: Proportion of women aged 20-24 years who were married or in a union before age 15 and before age 18

– Indicator 10.2.1: Proportion of people living below 50 percent of median income, by age, sex, and persons with disabilities

These indicators can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Target 3.7: By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programs Indicator 3.7.1: Proportion of women of reproductive age (aged 15-49 years) who have their need for family planning satisfied with modern methods
SDG 4: Quality Education Target 4.1: By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable, and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and effective learning outcomes Indicator 4.1.1: Proportion of children and young people (a) in grades 2/3; (b) at the end of primary; and (c) at the end of lower secondary achieving at least a minimum proficiency level in (i) reading and (ii) mathematics, by sex
SDG 5: Gender Equality Target 5.3: Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early, and forced marriage and female genital mutilation Indicator 5.3.1: Proportion of women aged 20-24 years who were married or in a union before age 15 and before age 18
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion, or economic or other status Indicator 10.2.1: Proportion of people living below 50 percent of median income, by age, sex, and persons with disabilities

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