5. GENDER EQUALITY

Grant to study video game targeting teen pregnancy | Cornell Chronicle

Grant to study video game targeting teen pregnancy | Cornell Chronicle
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Grant to study video game targeting teen pregnancy | Cornell …  Cornell Chronicle

Grant to study video game targeting teen pregnancy | Cornell Chronicle

Weill Cornell Medicine Receives Grant to Increase Contraception Use Among Black and Hispanic Adolescents

Weill Cornell Medicine has been awarded a five-year, $5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through the Office of Population Affairs under the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program to conduct a randomized trial testing whether a bilingual video game called No Baby No (No Bebé No) can increase the use of contraception among sexually active Black and Hispanic adolescents.

Introduction

Annually, there are over 10 million teen pregnancies in the U.S., of which about 75% are unintended with broad disparities. Pregnancy rates are two to three times higher among Black and Hispanic adolescents than white teens. The lower use of contraception is a major factor driving this difference: 23.2% of Black teens and 12.8% of Hispanic teens did not use contraception during their last sexual encounter compared to 6.8% of white teens, according to a 2020 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Objective

To address this disparity, Weill Cornell Medicine has partnered with Black and Hispanic teens to design a video game intervention that utilizes education, skill building, contraception promotion, and simulation training.

The No Baby No Video Game

No Baby No can be played in English or Spanish and begins in a house party setting. Players choose avatars (digital representations of partygoers) and guide them through different situations, including how to talk about sex with a partner, whether to have sex, and choosing to use contraception. Players earn points by unlocking evidence-based information and answering questions. They can then use points to “buy” contraception for their avatars.

Players’ avatars can speak with “Dr. AllGoodNoJudgment,” a virtual expert who facilitates medically accurate decision-making. Players spin a wheel to see if a pregnancy occurred based on their avatars’ choice of contraception or not using any. Players can then advance to the next level and enter a new party scenario.

Pilot Test Results

Pilot test results among 26 Black and Hispanic teens found that No Baby No increased reproductive health knowledge, self-efficacy, risk assessment skills, and intentions to use contraception. Previous focus group feedback informed game refinements, such as earning points for “buying” contraceptives and disabling the ability to use contraception if an avatar chooses to use alcohol or cannabis.

Collaboration and Recruitment

For the grant, Dr. Aileen Gariepy, the principal investigator, is collaborating with co-investigator Serena Flaherty, an adolescent health expert and Cornell-Hunter health equity research fellow at Weill Cornell Medicine. Gariepy is working locally to recruit 650 Black and Hispanic adolescents, ages 16 to 19, for the study. The Community Engagement and Research Component of Weill Cornell’s Clinical & Translational Science Center and NewYork-Presbyterian’s Division of Community and Population Health are facilitating collaborations with several organizations that provide programs for teens in New York City.

Study Design

Study participants will be randomized to play No Baby No or a popular non-sexual health video game on provided tablets for one hour weekly over four weeks. The research team will assess players’ reports of contraception use during their last sexual encounter at the beginning of the study, after four weeks of gameplay, and 12 months later.

Conclusion

“If No Baby No increases the use of contraception, it holds great promise for addressing racial and ethnic disparities by reducing unintended pregnancies,” Gariepy said. “At present, the game has a heterosexual focus, but if effective, we could easily add components for different groups and needs in the future.”

Jane Langille is a freelance writer for Weill Cornell Medicine.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

  1. SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being

    • Target 3.7: By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programs.
    • Indicator 3.7.1: Proportion of women of reproductive age (15-49 years) who have their need for family planning satisfied with modern methods.
  2. SDG 5: Gender Equality

    • Target 5.6: Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences.
    • Indicator 5.6.1: Proportion of women aged 15-49 years who make their own informed decisions regarding sexual relations, contraceptive use, and reproductive health care.
  3. SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities

    • Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion, or economic or other status.
    • Indicator 10.2.1: Proportion of people living below 50 percent of median income, by age, sex, and persons with disabilities.

Table: SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Target 3.7: By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programs. Indicator 3.7.1: Proportion of women of reproductive age (15-49 years) who have their need for family planning satisfied with modern methods.
SDG 5: Gender Equality Target 5.6: Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences. Indicator 5.6.1: Proportion of women aged 15-49 years who make their own informed decisions regarding sexual relations, contraceptive use, and reproductive health care.
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion, or economic or other status. Indicator 10.2.1: Proportion of people living below 50 percent of median income, by age, sex, and persons with disabilities.

Analysis

The issues highlighted in the article are connected to the following SDGs:

  • SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being
  • SDG 5: Gender Equality
  • SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities

Based on the article’s content, the specific targets under these SDGs can be identified:

  • Target 3.7: By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programs.
  • Target 5.6: Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences.
  • Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion, or economic or other status.

The article mentions or implies the following indicators that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets:

  • Indicator 3.7.1: Proportion of women of reproductive age (15-49 years) who have their need for family planning satisfied with modern methods.
  • Indicator 5.6.1: Proportion of women aged 15-49 years who make their own informed decisions regarding sexual relations, contraceptive use, and reproductive health care.
  • Indicator 10.2.1: Proportion of people living below 50 percent of median income, by age, sex, and persons with disabilities.

The article discusses the grant awarded to Weill Cornell Medicine to conduct a randomized trial testing the effectiveness of a bilingual video game called No Baby No in increasing the use of contraception among sexually active Black and Hispanic adolescents. This directly addresses the issue of reducing unintended pregnancies among these populations, which is linked to SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-being) and SDG 5 (Gender Equality). The targets identified are aligned with these SDGs, focusing on ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services and promoting reproductive rights. The indicators mentioned in the article can be used to measure progress towards these targets, specifically by assessing the proportion of women of reproductive age who have their need for family planning satisfied with modern methods and the proportion of women who make their own informed decisions regarding sexual relations and contraceptive use. The article also highlights the disparities in pregnancy rates among different racial and ethnic groups, emphasizing the need to address these inequalities, which connects to SDG 10 (Reduced Inequalities). The target identified under this SDG focuses on empowering and promoting the social inclusion of all individuals, irrespective of their background or status. The corresponding indicator measures the proportion of people living below a certain income threshold, taking into account age, sex, and disability. Overall, the article demonstrates efforts to address key issues related to sexual and reproductive health, gender equality, and reducing inequalities through innovative interventions like the No Baby No video game.

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: news.cornell.edu

 

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