3. GOOD HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

Unpacking the Child Abuse Case Against YouTube Influencer Ruby Franke – E! Online

Unpacking the Child Abuse Case Against YouTube Influencer Ruby Franke – E! Online
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

Unpacking the Child Abuse Case Against YouTube Influencer Ruby Franke  E! NEWS

Report on Concerns about Ruby Franke’s Children

Unpacking the Child Abuse Case Against YouTube Influencer Ruby Franke – E! Online

Introduction

Shari Franke, the eldest child of Ruby and Kevin Franke, who is now 20 years old, called the police on September 18, 2022, to request a welfare check on her younger siblings, according to police records obtained by KSLTV.

Concerns Raised by Neighbors

Neighbors who gathered outside when the police arrived at the Franke’s house expressed their concerns about the children being left alone, as stated in the police report. The officers could see children inside the house but received no response when they knocked on the door. As a result, they returned to the house on multiple occasions between September 22 and October 3 to assist the Department of Child and Family Services (DCFS).

Involvement of DCFS

DCFS confirmed its involvement in the Franke case earlier this month but declined to comment on previous visits. In a statement, the agency explained that it refrains from sharing specific information on a case, past or present, in order to protect the integrity of its working relationships and respect the privacy of children and families.

DCFS Screening Process

According to the Salt Lake Tribune, DCFS stated in a September 19 statement that every referral received by the agency goes through a screening process. Each referral is handled individually, taking into account the unique facts of each case based on the information provided.

Investigation Criteria

The agency clarified that an investigation into “non-supervision” falls under the category of neglect. However, an investigation is only initiated when the reported information includes a description of a specific occurrence or allegation that a child is subjected to accidental harm or an unreasonable risk of accidental harm.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators Analysis

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

  • SDG 1: No Poverty – The article discusses concerns about the welfare and well-being of the children, which relates to poverty and its impact on their living conditions.
  • SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being – The article mentions a welfare check being requested for the children, indicating potential concerns about their health and well-being.
  • SDG 4: Quality Education – Although not explicitly mentioned in the article, the involvement of child protective services (DCFS) suggests a potential connection to ensuring access to quality education for the children.
  • SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities – The article highlights concerns about the children being left at home alone, which may indicate a potential inequality in their care and supervision.

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

  • Target 1.2: By 2030, reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women, and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions – This target is relevant as the article raises concerns about the welfare of the children, which may be connected to their living conditions and potential poverty.
  • Target 3.2: By 2030, end preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age – While not explicitly mentioned in the article, the welfare check requested for the children suggests potential concerns about their health and well-being.
  • Target 4.1: By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable, and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and effective learning outcomes – Although not directly discussed, the involvement of child protective services (DCFS) may indicate a potential connection to ensuring access to quality education for the children.
  • Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion, or economic or other status – The concerns raised about the children being left at home alone may indicate a potential inequality in their care and supervision.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

  • Indicator 1.2.1: Proportion of population living below the national poverty line, by sex and age – This indicator can be used to measure progress towards reducing poverty, which may be connected to the concerns raised about the welfare of the children.
  • Indicator 3.2.1: Under-five mortality rate – While not explicitly mentioned in the article, this indicator can be used to measure progress towards reducing preventable deaths of children under 5 years of age.
  • Indicator 4.1.1: Proportion of children and young people (a) in grades 2/3; (b) at the end of primary; and (c) at the end of lower secondary achieving at least a minimum proficiency level in (i) reading and (ii) mathematics, by sex – Although not directly discussed, this indicator can be used to measure progress towards ensuring access to quality education for the children.
  • Indicator 10.2.1: Proportion of people living below 50 percent of median income, by age, sex, and persons with disabilities – The concerns raised about the children being left at home alone may indicate a potential inequality in their care and supervision, which can be measured using this indicator.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators Table

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 1: No Poverty Target 1.2: By 2030, reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women, and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions Indicator 1.2.1: Proportion of population living below the national poverty line, by sex and age
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Target 3.2: By 2030, end preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age Indicator 3.2.1: Under-five mortality rate
SDG 4: Quality Education Target 4.1: By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable, and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and effective learning outcomes Indicator 4.1.1: Proportion of children and young people (a) in grades 2/3; (b) at the end of primary; and (c) at the end of lower secondary achieving at least a minimum proficiency level in (i) reading and (ii) mathematics, by sex
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion, or economic or other status Indicator 10.2.1: Proportion of people living below 50 percent of median income, by age, sex, and persons with disabilities

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: eonline.com

 

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