10. REDUCED INEQUALITIES

New Yorker Cover Showing Top US Politicians Using Walkers Draws Cries of Ageism: ‘Disgusting and Vulgar’

New Yorker Cover Showing Top US Politicians Using Walkers Draws Cries of Ageism: ‘Disgusting and Vulgar’
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New Yorker Cover Showing Top US Politicians Using Walkers Draws Cries of Ageism: ‘Disgusting and Vulgar’  Yahoo Entertainment

New Yorker Cover Showing Top US Politicians Using Walkers Draws Cries of Ageism: ‘Disgusting and Vulgar’

The Race for Office: A Controversial New Yorker Cover

The latest cover of The New Yorker magazine has sparked controversy and ignited discussions about ageism and ableism in politics. The cartoon, titled “The Race for Office” by Barry Blitt, depicts four prominent U.S. politicians – Donald Trump (77), Mitch McConnell (81), Nancy Pelosi (83), and Joe Biden (80) – all portrayed as elderly individuals using walkers.

Ageism and Ableism in Politics

The cartoon, while intended to highlight the “absurdity of the advanced-age politicians” currently vying for or occupying top U.S. offices, has drawn criticism for its portrayal of the elderly and individuals with disabilities.

Some argue that the cartoon perpetuates stereotypes and mocks those who rely on walkers or have disabilities. They believe it is disrespectful and offensive to use age and disability as a source of humor.

Reactions to the Cartoon

Many individuals took to social media to express their outrage and disappointment with the cartoon. Here are a few examples:

  1. “Hey, New Yorker: THIS is seriously your cover for next week’s magazine? Not only is it incredibly ageist but it’s ableist & a slap in the face to every person in America who needs a walker & who has a disability. This is disgusting & vulgar beyond words. Just STOP it already.” – Victor Shi
  2. “Once again the media uses ableism to criticize Congress while continuing to ignore the barriers that disabled people of all ages experience running for & serving in elected office. Imagery like this harms disabled people & fails to acknowledge our history fighting for our rights.” – Disability Victory
  3. “Time for these old f&cks to get together at Golden Corral for the Early Bird Senior Citizen Discount. They’re all on the same team: the Geriatric Gimps of Gaslighting.” – Pendergrass
  4. “This is a blatantly ableist and disgusting cover from the New Yorker. Plenty of younger disabled people use walkers or assistance too. Absolutely vulgar.” – Eric Michael Garcia
  5. “Boycott ABC, Washington Post & The New Yorker. I owned THREE walkers at one point before I was 50yo due to 5 autoimmune disabilities that prevented me from serving in the Navy. This cover on an AMERICAN magazine makes me feel like the Nazis have truly landed.” – ejrios

These reactions highlight the strong emotions and concerns raised by the cartoon’s portrayal of aging politicians using walkers.

Discussion on Gerontocracy and the Sustainable Development Goals

The controversy surrounding this cartoon also raises broader questions about the representation and inclusion of older individuals in politics. Some argue that the United States may be at risk of becoming a “sclerotic gerontocracy,” where power is concentrated in the hands of older individuals.

This discussion aligns with the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities and Goal 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions. These goals emphasize the importance of promoting inclusivity, equality, and fair representation in all aspects of society, including politics.

By addressing ageism and ableism in political cartoons and public discourse, societies can work towards achieving these SDGs and creating a more inclusive and equitable future for all.

The New Yorker cover has sparked a necessary conversation about the portrayal of aging politicians and the need for greater representation and respect for individuals with disabilities. It serves as a reminder of the ongoing challenges faced by marginalized groups and the importance of striving for a more inclusive society.

Sources:

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators Analysis

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

  • SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being
  • SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities

The article discusses the issue of ageism and ableism, which are connected to the broader goals of promoting good health and well-being (SDG 3) and reducing inequalities (SDG 10).

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

  • SDG 3.8: Achieve universal health coverage, including financial risk protection, access to quality essential health-care services, and access to safe, effective, quality, and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all.
  • SDG 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status.

The article highlights the need to address ageism and ableism in society, which aligns with the targets of achieving universal health coverage and promoting social inclusion for all individuals.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

  • Indicator for SDG 3.8: Proportion of population with access to affordable essential medicines and vaccines on a sustainable basis.
  • Indicator for SDG 10.2: Proportion of people who feel discriminated against or harassed in the past 12 months based on a ground of discrimination prohibited under international human rights law.

The article does not explicitly mention indicators, but the identified targets can be measured using indicators such as the proportion of population with access to affordable essential medicines and vaccines and the proportion of people who experience discrimination or harassment based on prohibited grounds of discrimination.

Table: SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Achieve universal health coverage, including financial risk protection, access to quality essential health-care services, and access to safe, effective, quality, and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all. Proportion of population with access to affordable essential medicines and vaccines on a sustainable basis.
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status. Proportion of people who feel discriminated against or harassed in the past 12 months based on a ground of discrimination prohibited under international human rights law.

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: yahoo.com

 

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