10. REDUCED INEQUALITIES

10 questions that reveal how much you know about ageism and its costs

10 questions that reveal how much you know about ageism and its costs
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

10 questions that reveal how much you know about ageism and its costs  LA Daily News

10 questions that reveal how much you know about ageism and its costs

Ageism Awareness Day: Challenging Stereotypes and Discrimination against Older People

Introduction

October 7 is Ageism Awareness Day for a good reason: Ageism is alive and well; it’s everywhere as a stereotype, prejudice and ultimately as an act of discrimination against older people, all based on age.

We see it in the entertainment, tech, and greeting-card industries. It exists in our healthcare systems and within social media, medical research and among families and friends. Ageism is the most widespread and socially accepted form of prejudice, often considered normative. And that’s the problem. Many are unaware they harbor ageist attitudes towards others, themselves or support ageist policies, programs or practices.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

  1. Goal 1: No Poverty
  2. Goal 3: Good Health and Well-being
  3. Goal 5: Gender Equality
  4. Goal 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
  5. Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities
  6. Goal 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
  7. Goal 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
  8. Goal 17: Partnerships for the Goals

Legislation against Ageism

We have federal legislation to counteract ageism in the workplace. It’s called the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) applicable to companies with 20 or more employees. The law makes it illegal to discriminate against those aged 40 and older based on their age for decisions of employment, promotion, compensation, raises, termination, training and more.

There’s the rub. One can legislate actions but not how one thinks and feels. Ageism Awareness Day is a wake-up call to do just that.

Ageism Quiz

  1. The term “ageism” is a relatively recent term having been coined 20 years ago.
  2. False. The late geriatrician Dr. Robert N. Butler defined ageism as the systemic discrimination against older people in 1968. That was 55 years ago.

  3. Ageist attitudes typically are developed in the young adult years as they have increased exposure to older workers in the workplace.
  4. False. Ageism and age stereotypes are often internalized at a young age — long before they are even relevant. Even by the age of 3, children are familiar with age stereotypes, which are reinforced over their lifetimes.

  5. Older persons with a more positive self-perception of aging live 7.5 years longer than those with a less positive self-perception.
  6. True. Self-perceptions can influence how long we live. Research by Becca Levy, professor of Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health, noted this longevity advantage remained regardless of the age, gender, socioeconomic status, loneliness and functional health of the research participants.

  7. Ageism is a detriment to older adults’ financial well-being.
  8. True. Older adults who seek work face longer periods of unemployment and discrimination during the hiring process and have fewer professional development opportunities. All of this leads to fewer opportunities for earning.

  9. Ageism has little impact on our economy.
  10. False. Because older workers experience involuntary retirement, underemployment and unemployment, the U.S. economy has lost $850 billion dollars, according to AARP. By 2050, losses due to age discrimination could reach $3.9 trillion.

  11. Older adults typically are included in clinical trials.
  12. False. Older adults typically are not included in clinical trials and are less likely to receive preventative care. Ageism in healthcare has been linked to decreased survival rates, inadequate or inappropriate care, more emergency room visits and hospitalizations and more.

  13. We generally have sufficient geriatricians in the U.S.
  14. False. We have 8,220 full-time practicing geriatricians in the U.S. and 56 million adults ages 65 or older; 30 percent need a geriatrician. And each geriatrician typically can see 700 patients.

  15. Among medical specialties, geriatrics is considered among the most lucrative.
  16. False. Geriatricians earn on average $233,564 annually. Anesthesiologists are paid twice that and cardiologists and radiologists’ salaries top $500,000.

  17. Marketers and advertisers have become increasingly aware of the senior market and are allocating a significant amount of their budgets

    SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

    SDGs Targets Indicators
    SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Target 3.4: By 2030, reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being Indicator not mentioned in the article
    SDG 5: Gender Equality Target 5.1: End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere Indicator not mentioned in the article
    SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth Target 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value Indicator not mentioned in the article
    SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status Indicator not mentioned in the article
    SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities Target 11.7: By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities Indicator not mentioned in the article
    SDG 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions Target 16.7: Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels Indicator not mentioned in the article

    1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

    The SDGs that are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article are:

    • SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being
    • SDG 5: Gender Equality
    • SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
    • SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities
    • SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
    • SDG 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

    2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

    The specific targets under those SDGs that can be identified based on the article’s content are:

    • Target 3.4: By 2030, reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being (SDG 3)
    • Target 5.1: End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere (SDG 5)
    • Target 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value (SDG 8)
    • Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status (SDG 10)
    • Target 11.7: By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities (SDG 11)
    • Target 16.7: Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels (SDG 16)

    3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

    No, there are no indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets.

    4. SDGs, Targets and Indicators

    SDGs Targets Indicators
    SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Target 3.4: By 2030, reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being Indicator not mentioned in the article
    SDG 5: Gender Equality Target 5.1: End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere Indicator not mentioned in the article
    SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth Target 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value Indicator not mentioned in the article
    SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status Indicator not mentioned in the article
    SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities Target 11.7: By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities Indicator not mentioned in the article
    SDG

    Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

    Source: dailynews.com

     

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