5. GENDER EQUALITY

Cultural Barriers Hindering Sexual Reproductive Health knowledge Transfer, Says Zambia’s First Lady

Cultural Barriers Hindering Sexual Reproductive Health knowledge Transfer, Says Zambia’s First Lady
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

Cultural Barriers Hindering Sexual Reproductive Health knowledge …  EIN News

Zambia’s First Lady Calls for Parental Guidance on Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights

The First Lady of Zambia, Mutinta Hichilema, has highlighted the presence of cultural barriers that hinder young people from seeking guidance on their sexual reproductive health and rights (SRHR) from their parents. She emphasizes that the lack of information on prevention, treatment, and care programs is a critical factor contributing to high rates of new HIV infections among young people.

Mrs. Hichilema asserts that it is the responsibility of parents to provide guidance to their children on matters of life, including SRHR, in order to prevent them from seeking potentially misleading information from alternative sources. She urges parents to recognize the impact of the technologically advanced environment in which children are growing up, which exposes them to a wide range of cross-cultural information on SRHR that they may not be equipped to handle without parental guidance.

Efforts to Address the Issue

During the official opening of the 7th Annual International Workshop on HIV and Adolescence 2023 at Lusaka’s Taji Pamodzi Hotel, Mrs. Hichilema expressed her concerns. The Ministry of Health Permanent Secretary in charge of Administration, Professor Christopher Simoonga, also acknowledged the alarming rates of HIV infections among adolescents and young people in Zambia. These groups account for 50% of all new infections in the country.

Professor Simoonga stated that the Zambian government has implemented strategies to address this challenge, including the recently launched Global Action Plan to End AIDS in Children. This plan is seen as a milestone in preventing and treating HIV infections.

Dr. Izukanji Sikazwe, the Chief Executive Officer of the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia (CIDRZ), emphasized the importance of focusing on adolescents and their health outcomes. She highlighted the need to place adolescents at the center of HIV response efforts in order to effectively support them. Dr. Sikazwe emphasized the significance of understanding and addressing the specific health needs of each adolescent, tailoring responses accordingly for better overall outcomes.

The Role of Collaboration and Innovation

This year’s workshop theme, “Out of the Box Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) and HIV Innovation for, with, and by Adolescents,” suggests a creative and unconventional approach to addressing the sexual and reproductive health needs of adolescents, as well as HIV prevention and treatment. Dr. Sikazwe noted that this theme promotes collaboration with adolescents, understanding their perspectives, and designing solutions that cater to their unique needs and challenges.

Dr. Sikazwe expressed gratitude to the office of the First Lady, the Zambian people, and all stakeholders involved in ensuring the success of the International Workshop on HIV and Adolescence being held in Zambia for the first time.

Conclusion

The workshop, which has attracted about 500 participants, aims to address critical knowledge gaps within the fast-evolving landscape of HIV and adolescence. It also seeks to foster new partnerships to drive further progress in realizing healthy and fulfilling lives for all adolescents across all populations.

  1. Cultural Barriers Hindering Sexual Reproductive Health knowledge Transfer, Says Zambia’s First Lady
  2. SDGs, Targets, and Indicators Analysis

    1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

    • SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being
    • SDG 4: Quality Education
    • SDG 5: Gender Equality
    • SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities
    • SDG 17: Partnerships for the Goals

    The article discusses issues related to sexual reproductive health, HIV prevention, and treatment among adolescents and young people in Zambia. These issues are directly connected to SDG 3, which aims to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages. Additionally, the article highlights the importance of education and parental guidance in addressing these issues, aligning with SDG 4 on quality education. The article also emphasizes the need for gender equality (SDG 5) and reducing inequalities (SDG 10) in accessing sexual reproductive health information and services. Lastly, the involvement of various stakeholders and partnerships mentioned in the article reflects SDG 17 on partnerships for the goals.

    2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

    • Target 3.3: By 2030, end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, and neglected tropical diseases and combat hepatitis, water-borne diseases, and other communicable diseases.
    • Target 4.7: By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles.
    • Target 5.6: Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences.
    • Target 10.3: Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies, and practices and promoting appropriate legislation, policies, and action in this regard.
    • Target 17.16: Enhance the global partnership for sustainable development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology, and financial resources to support the achievement of the sustainable development goals in all countries.

    Based on the article’s content, the identified targets include ending the epidemic of AIDS (Target 3.3), promoting education for sustainable development (Target 4.7), ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health (Target 5.6), reducing inequalities (Target 10.3), and enhancing global partnerships for sustainable development (Target 17.16).

    3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

    • Indicator 3.3.1: Number of new HIV infections per 1,000 uninfected population, by sex, age, and key populations.
    • Indicator 4.7.1: Extent to which (i) global citizenship education and (ii) education for sustainable development are mainstreamed in (a) national education policies; (b) curricula; (c) teacher education; and (d) student assessment.
    • Indicator 5.6.1: Proportion of women aged 15-49 years who make their own informed decisions regarding sexual relations, contraceptive use, and reproductive health care.
    • Indicator 10.3.1: Proportion of the population reporting having personally felt discriminated against or harassed in the previous 12 months on the basis of a ground of discrimination prohibited under international human rights law.
    • Indicator 17.16.1: Number of countries reporting progress in multi-stakeholder development effectiveness monitoring frameworks that support the achievement of the sustainable development goals.

    The article implies the use of indicators such as the number of new HIV infections (Indicator 3.3.1), mainstreaming global citizenship education and education for sustainable development (Indicator 4.7.1), proportion of women making informed decisions on reproductive health (Indicator 5.6.1), proportion of the population experiencing discrimination (Indicator 10.3.1), and progress in multi-stakeholder development effectiveness monitoring frameworks (Indicator 17.16.1) to measure progress towards the identified targets.

    4. Table: SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

    Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

    Source: einnews.com

     

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    About the author

    ZJbTFBGJ2T

    SDGs Targets Indicators
    SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Target 3.3: By 2030, end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, and neglected tropical diseases and combat hepatitis, water-borne diseases, and other communicable diseases. Indicator 3.3.1: Number of new HIV infections per 1,000 uninfected population, by sex, age, and key populations.
    SDG 4: Quality Education Target 4.7: By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles. Indicator 4.7.1: Extent to which (i) global citizenship education and (ii) education for sustainable development are mainstreamed in (a) national education policies; (b) curricula; (c) teacher education; and (d) student assessment.
    SDG 5: Gender Equality Target 5.6: Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences. Indicator 5.6.1: Proportion of women aged 15-49 years who make their own informed decisions regarding sexual relations, contraceptive use, and reproductive health care.
    SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities Target 10.3: Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies, and practices and promoting appropriate legislation, policies, and action in this regard. Indicator 10.3.1: Proportion of the population reporting having personally felt discriminated against or harassed in the previous 12 months on the basis of a ground of discrimination prohibited under international human rights law.