3. GOOD HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

1 in 10 babies worldwide are born early, with major impacts on health and survival

1 in 10 babies worldwide are born early, with major impacts on health and survival
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1 in 10 babies worldwide are born early, with major impacts on …  World Health Organization

1 in 10 babies worldwide are born early, with major impacts on health and survival

An estimated 13.4 million babies born prematurely in 2020, says study

An estimated 13.4 million babies were born early (before 37 full weeks of pregnancy) in 2020 – which is around 1 in 10 of all live births – according to a detailed study published in the Lancet today by authors from the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Urgent need to address prematurity for improved childhood survival

Since prematurity is the leading cause of death in children’s early years, there is an urgent need to strengthen both care for preterm babies as well as prevention efforts – particularly maternal health and nutrition – so as to improve childhood survival. For those who live, preterm birth also significantly increases the likelihood of suffering major illnesses, disability and developmental delays, and even chronic diseases as adults like diabetes and heart conditions.

No significant reduction in preterm births globally

As with other major trends relating to maternal health, no region of the world has significantly reduced rates of preterm births over the last decade. The annual global rate of reduction in preterm births between 2010 and 2020 was just 0.14%.

“Preterm babies are especially vulnerable to life-threatening health complications and they need special care and attention,” said Dr Anshu Banerjee, Director of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health and Ageing at WHO: “These numbers show an urgent need for serious investment in services available to support them and their families as well as a greater focus on prevention – in particular, ensuring access to quality health care before and during every pregnancy.”

Disparities in preterm birth rates between regions and countries

The paper, National, regional, and global estimates of preterm birth in 2020, with trends from 2010: a systematic analysis, provides global, regional and country estimates and trends for preterm births between 2010 and 2020, revealing large disparities between regions and countries. Around 65% of preterm births in 2020 occurred in sub-Saharan Africa and southern Asia, where over 13% babies were born preterm. The rates in the worse affected countries – Bangladesh (16.2%), Malawi (14.5%) and Pakistan (14.3%) – are three or four times higher than those in the least affected countries – Serbia (3.8%), Moldova (4%) and Kazakhstan (4.7%).

Preterm birth is not just an issue in low and middle-income countries, however, and the data shows clearly that it affects families in all parts of the world. Rates of 10% or higher occur in some high-income countries such as Greece (11.6%) and the United States of America (10%).

Maternal health risks linked to preterm births

Maternal health risks, such as adolescent pregnancy, infections, poor nutrition, and pre-eclampsia, are closely linked to preterm births. Quality antenatal care is critical to detect and manage complications, to ensure accurate pregnancy dating through early ultrasound scans and if needed, to delay labour through approved treatments.

About the studies

The paper derives estimates from population-based, nationally representative data, using Bayesian modelling to generate internationally comparable country-level estimates for 2020. These national estimates are published for the first time in this paper and on the WHO website.

As birth registration and facility-based deliveries have increased, data on the prevalence of preterm birth has improved. Gaps remain, however, with 92 countries lacking adequate nationally representative data. The authors call for continued commitment to strengthen data availability and quality, as well as data sharing so that appropriate support and action can be targeted where needed most.

Further links

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

  1. SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being

    • Target 3.2: By 2030, end preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age, with all countries aiming to reduce neonatal mortality to at least as low as 12 per 1,000 live births.
    • Indicator 3.2.2: Neonatal mortality rate (per 1,000 live births).
  2. SDG 5: Gender Equality

    • Target 5.6: Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences.
    • Indicator 5.6.1: Proportion of women aged 15-49 years who make their own informed decisions regarding sexual relations, contraceptive use, and reproductive health care.
  3. SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities

    • Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status.
    • Indicator 10.2.1: Proportion of people living below 50 percent of median income, by age, sex, and persons with disabilities.

Table: SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Target 3.2: By 2030, end preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age, with all countries aiming to reduce neonatal mortality to at least as low as 12 per 1,000 live births. Indicator 3.2.2: Neonatal mortality rate (per 1,000 live births).
SDG 5: Gender Equality Target 5.6: Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences. Indicator 5.6.1: Proportion of women aged 15-49 years who make their own informed decisions regarding sexual relations, contraceptive use, and reproductive health care.
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status. Indicator 10.2.1: Proportion of people living below 50 percent of median income, by age, sex, and persons with disabilities.

Analysis

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

The SDGs addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article are SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being, SDG 5: Gender Equality, and SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities.

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

Based on the article’s content, the specific targets under those SDGs are:

– Target 3.2: By 2030, end preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age, with all countries aiming to reduce neonatal mortality to at least as low as 12 per 1,000 live births.

– Target 5.6: Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences.

– Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

Yes, there are indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets. The indicators are:

– Indicator 3.2.2: Neonatal mortality rate (per 1,000 live births) – measures progress towards Target 3.2.

– Indicator 5.6.1: Proportion of women aged 15-49 years who make their own informed decisions regarding sexual relations, contraceptive use, and reproductive health care – measures progress towards Target 5.6.

– Indicator 10.2.1: Proportion of people living below 50 percent of median income, by age, sex, and persons with disabilities – measures progress towards Target 10.2.

The article highlights the need to reduce neonatal mortality and improve access to reproductive health care, indicating the relevance of these indicators.

4. Create a table with three columns titled ‘SDGs, Targets and Indicators” to present the findings from analyzing the article.

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Target 3.2: By 2030, end preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age, with all countries aiming to reduce neonatal mortality to at least as low as 12 per 1,000 live births. Indicator 3.2.2: Neonatal mortality rate (per 1,000 live births).
SDG 5: Gender Equality Target 5.6: Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: who.int

 

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