11. SUSTAINABLE CITIES AND COMMUNITIES

Washington state ramps up fight against air pollution with new data-collecting devices

Washington state ramps up fight against air pollution with new data-collecting devices
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

Washington state ramps up fight against air pollution with new data-collecting devices  KOMO News

Washington state ramps up fight against air pollution with new data-collecting devices

Air Pollution Data Collection to Support Sustainable Development Goals

As the planes fly overhead in Seattle’s South Park neighborhood, they are a constant reminder of the impact air pollution can have on someone’s health.

This community is no stranger to pollution, and nearby parts of the Duwamish River are among the most polluted in the country.

It is these vulnerable communities and others that the state is trying to get air pollution data on in an attempt to provide them with more funding.

Monitoring Air Pollution for Sustainable Development

Earlier in the week, Gov. Jay Inslee was in Seattle’s Beacon Hill neighborhood. Inslee was shown new devices that will record data on pollutants you can breathe in and that cause health issues like vehicle exhaust and wildfire smoke.

While this is an important step, Deric Gruen from the state-wide climate coalition Front and Centered emphasized the need for actionable data to monitor progress and regulate pollution, especially from industries. Gruen also stressed the importance of listening to community experiences and placing monitors in areas with poor air quality and health impacts. Immediate action is required to reduce pollution rather than waiting for several years.

Sharing Data and Funding Communities

The Washington Department of Ecology officials announced that starting this year, they will produce biennial reports on each community, sharing the collected data online for public access. The sites for air quality devices will be re-evaluated in six years.

The officials further stated that reducing air pollution in overburdened areas across Washington will occur in stages over multiple years. The granular data collected from expanding the network will inform the development of stricter air quality standards and a community grant program aimed at reducing air pollution for the most impacted communities. The rulemaking process for these standards and the design of the grant program will begin early next year, with $10 million in funding to be awarded to communities over the next two years.

Immediate Actions for Cleaner Air

Gruen provided examples of immediate steps the state can take, including changing the permitting process for industries to consider the history of pollution in neighborhoods and setting lower limits. Additionally, Gruen emphasized the need to invest in public transportation systems, electrified transportation for heavy-duty vehicles, and address energy systems and indoor air quality.

Gruen emphasized the importance of simultaneous action, stating, “We don’t want to have the experience where, ‘Oh, we’re doing this here. Let’s wait and see how it plays out.’ We want to see both things happen at once.”

Expanding Monitoring Efforts

The Washington Department of Ecology officials announced plans to install additional sensors in various locations across the state, including Brewster, Burbank, Cashmere, Cheney, Cle Elum, Entiat, Enumclaw, George, Goldendale, Issaquah, Kennewick, Manson, Mattawa, Mount Rainier, Newport, Oroville, Padilla Bay, Royal City, Spokane, Stevenson, Tonasket, Vancouver, and White Salmon. They anticipate rolling out at least another 50 monitoring sensors in early 2024.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

  1. SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being

    • Target 3.9: By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water, and soil pollution and contamination.
      • Indicator: Air pollution data on vulnerable communities to provide more funding for addressing health issues caused by pollutants.
  2. SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities

    • Target 11.6: By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management.
      • Indicator: Data collection on air pollution in communities to inform the development of stricter air quality standards and a community grant program for reducing pollution.
  3. SDG 13: Climate Action

    • Target 13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies, and planning.
      • Indicator: Investment in public transportation systems and electrified transportation of heavy-duty vehicles to address energy systems and reduce air pollution.

Table: SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Target 3.9: By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water, and soil pollution and contamination. Air pollution data on vulnerable communities to provide more funding for addressing health issues caused by pollutants.
SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities Target 11.6: By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management. Data collection on air pollution in communities to inform the development of stricter air quality standards and a community grant program for reducing pollution.
SDG 13: Climate Action Target 13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies, and planning. Investment in public transportation systems and electrified transportation of heavy-duty vehicles to address energy systems and reduce air pollution.

Analysis

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

The SDGs addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article are SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-being), SDG 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities), and SDG 13 (Climate Action).

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

The specific targets identified based on the article’s content are:

– Target 3.9: By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water, and soil pollution and contamination.

– Target 11.6: By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management.

– Target 13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies, and planning.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

Yes, there are indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets. These indicators include:

– Air pollution data on vulnerable communities to provide more funding for addressing health issues caused by pollutants.

– Data collection on air pollution in communities to inform the development of stricter air quality standards and a community grant program for reducing pollution.

– Investment in public transportation systems and electrified transportation of heavy-duty vehicles to address energy systems and reduce air pollution.

These indicators help measure progress in reducing deaths and illnesses from pollution, improving air quality in cities, and integrating climate change measures into policies and planning.

By analyzing the article, we can identify the relevant SDGs, targets, and indicators as mentioned above. The article highlights the importance of addressing air pollution and its impact on health, particularly in vulnerable communities. It also emphasizes the need for data collection, stricter standards, and investments in sustainable transportation to reduce pollution and improve air quality.

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: komonews.com

 

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