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USDA Assists Farmers, Ranchers, and Communities Affected by Montana Floods

USDA Assists Farmers, Ranchers, and Communities Affected by Montana Floods
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USDA Assists Farmers, Ranchers, and Communities Affected by …  USDA.gov

USDA Assists Farmers, Ranchers, and Communities Affected by Montana Floods

President Biden Declares Major Disaster in Montana

WASHINGTON, Oct. 13, 2023 – President Joe Biden has declared a major disaster in the State of Montana following flooding across 10 counties in June of this year. In response, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has directed the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to aid recovery efforts. USDA staff in the regional, state, and county offices are responding and providing a variety of program flexibilities and other assistance to residents, agricultural producers, and impacted communities.

Risk Management and Disaster Assistance for Agricultural Operations

USDA offers several risk management and disaster assistance options to help producers recover after disasters.

The Federal Crop Insurance Program, a partnership between USDA’s Risk Management Agency and private companies and agents, or the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) covers losses for the 2023 crop year for participating producers.

Livestock and perennial crop producers often have more limited risk management options available, so there are several disaster programs for them. Key programs offered by FSA include:

  • The Livestock Indemnity Program and the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybee and Farm-raised Fish Program reimburses producers for a portion of the value of livestock, poultry, and other animals that were killed or severely injured by a natural disaster or loss of feed and grazing acres.
  • The Tree Assistance Program provides cost share assistance to rehabilitate or replant orchards and vineyards when storms kill or damage the trees, vines, or bushes. NAP or Federal Crop Insurance often only covers the crop and not the plant.
  • The Emergency Conservation Program and Emergency Forest Restoration Program can assist landowners and forest stewards with financial and technical assistance to restore damaged farmland or forests.
  • FSA also offers a variety of direct and guaranteed farm loans, including operating and emergency farm loans, to producers unable to secure commercial financing. Loans can help producers replace essential property, purchase inputs like livestock, equipment, feed and seed, cover family living expenses or refinance farm-related debts and other needs.

It is also critical that producers keep accurate records to document damage or loss and to report losses to their local USDA Service Center as soon as possible.

Additionally, USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service can provide financial resources through its Environmental Quality Incentives Program to help with immediate needs and long-term support to help recover from natural disasters and conserve water resources. USDA can also assist local government sponsors with the cost of recovery efforts like debris removal and streambank stabilization to address natural resource concerns and hazards through the Emergency Watershed Protection Program.

On farmers.gov, the Disaster Assistance Discovery Tool, Disaster Assistance-at-a-Glance fact sheet (PDF, 4.6 MB) and Farm Loan Discovery Tool can help producers and landowners determine program or loan options. For assistance with a crop insurance claim, producers and landowners should contact their crop insurance agent. For FSA and NRCS programs, they should contact their local USDA Service Center.

USDA touches the lives of all Americans each day in so many positive ways. In the Biden-Harris Administration, USDA is transforming America’s food system with a greater focus on more resilient local and regional food production, fairer markets for all producers, ensuring access to safe, healthy, and nutritious food in all communities, building new markets and streams of income for farmers and producers using climate smart food and forestry practices, making historic investments in infrastructure and clean energy capabilities in rural America, and committing to equity across the Department by removing systemic barriers and building a workforce more representative of America. To learn more, visit www.usda.gov.

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USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators Analysis

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

  • SDG 1: No Poverty
  • SDG 2: Zero Hunger
  • SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation
  • SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
  • SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
  • SDG 13: Climate Action
  • SDG 15: Life on Land

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

  • SDG 1.5: By 2030, build the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reduce their exposure and vulnerability to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social, and environmental shocks and disasters.
  • SDG 2.4: By 2030, ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding, and other disasters, and that progressively improve land and soil quality.
  • SDG 6.5: By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate.
  • SDG 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value.
  • SDG 11.5: By 2030, significantly reduce the number of deaths and the number of people affected and substantially decrease the direct economic losses relative to global gross domestic product caused by disasters, including water-related disasters, with a focus on protecting the poor and people in vulnerable situations.
  • SDG 13.1: Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries.
  • SDG 15.9: By 2020, integrate ecosystem and biodiversity values into national and local planning, development processes, poverty reduction strategies, and accounts.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

Yes, there are indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets. These include:

  • Number of disaster declarations made by the President
  • Number of counties affected by flooding
  • Number of agricultural producers and impacted communities receiving assistance
  • Number of participating producers covered by the Federal Crop Insurance Program or Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program
  • Amount of financial assistance provided through programs like the Livestock Indemnity Program, Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybee and Farm-raised Fish Program, Tree Assistance Program, Emergency Conservation Program, and Emergency Forest Restoration Program
  • Number of direct and guaranteed farm loans provided to producers
  • Amount of financial resources provided through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program and Emergency Watershed Protection Program

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators Table

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 1: No Poverty Target 1.5: By 2030, build the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reduce their exposure and vulnerability to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social, and environmental shocks and disasters. – Number of disaster declarations made by the President
– Number of counties affected by flooding
– Number of agricultural producers and impacted communities receiving assistance
SDG 2: Zero Hunger Target 2.4: By 2030, ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding, and other disasters, and that progressively improve land and soil quality. – Number of participating producers covered by the Federal Crop Insurance Program or Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program
SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation Target 6.5: By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate. – Amount of financial resources provided through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program and Emergency Watershed Protection Program
SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth Target 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value. – Number of direct and guaranteed farm loans provided to producers
SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities Target 11.5: By 2030, significantly reduce the number of deaths and the number of people affected and substantially decrease the direct economic losses relative to global gross domestic product caused by disasters, including water-related disasters, with a focus on protecting the poor and people in vulnerable situations. – Number of disaster declarations made by the President
– Number of counties affected by flooding
– Number of agricultural producers and impacted communities receiving assistance
SDG 13: Climate Action Target 13.1: Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries. – Number of disaster declarations made by the President
– Number of counties affected by flooding
– Number of agricultural producers and impacted communities receiving assistance
SDG 15: Life on Land Target 15.9: By 2020, integrate ecosystem and biodiversity values into national and local planning, development processes, poverty reduction strategies, and accounts. – Amount of financial resources provided through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program and Emergency Watershed Protection Program

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: usda.gov

 

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