8. DECENT WORK AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

India needs more employment intensive growth and good quality jobs, says ILO

India needs more employment intensive growth and good quality jobs, says ILO
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India needs more employment intensive growth and good quality jobs, says ILO  The Economic Times

India needs more employment intensive growth and good quality jobs, says ILO

India Needs to Improve Job Quality and Youth Employment, says ILO Report

The International Labour Organisation (ILO), in collaboration with the Institute for Human Development, has released a recent report emphasizing the need for India to make its growth and production more employment intensive while improving the quality of jobs. The report highlights five critical policy issues that require intervention at the national and state levels to address the decent work deficits faced by youth in the country. It also emphasizes the need to overcome labour market inequalities, enhance the effectiveness of skills training and active labour market policies, and bridge the knowledge gaps on labour market patterns and youth employment.

India’s Potential for Demographic Dividend

The report, titled “India Employment Report 2024,” states that India has the world’s largest youth population and can benefit from its demographic dividend for at least another decade. With 7-8 million youth entering the labour market annually, the creation of decent and productive jobs in manufacturing and other sectors will be crucial to meet their needs. The report acknowledges that Indian youth are increasingly engaging in new forms of employment like gig and platform work, which necessitates new approaches to provide opportunities while ensuring their protection from vulnerability.

Challenges in Accessing Quality Jobs

Despite higher levels of education among youth compared to previous generations, the report highlights the challenges they face in accessing better quality formal jobs. The skills landscape in India has undergone a transformation to address supply-demand gaps and skill mismatches. However, a persistent gender gap exists in the labour market, particularly in women’s employment. Women are disproportionately represented in lower-paid occupations and the agriculture sector, while men are more likely to participate in the tertiary sector.

Addressing the Challenges

The report suggests that India needs multi-pronged strategies to tackle the challenges of educated youth unemployment, especially among young women. This includes improving the quality of education and actively involving the private sector in skill development programs. It emphasizes the importance of aligning youth aspirations with the available employment opportunities in the labour market.

Conclusion

The India Employment Report 2024 provides insights into the emerging economic, labour market, educational, and skills scenarios in India. It highlights the need for India to prioritize sustainable development goals, particularly those related to decent work and youth employment. By addressing the identified policy issues and implementing effective strategies, India can leverage its demographic dividend and create a more inclusive and prosperous future for its youth.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

  1. SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth

    • Target 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities.
    • Indicator: Youth employment rate
    • Indicator: Proportion of youth not in education, employment, or training (NEET)
  2. SDG 4: Quality Education

    • Target 4.4: By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs, and entrepreneurship.
    • Indicator: Proportion of youth and adults with information and communications technology (ICT) skills
    • Indicator: Proportion of youth and adults with skills relevant to employment, decent jobs, and entrepreneurship
  3. SDG 5: Gender Equality

    • Target 5.1: End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere.
    • Indicator: Proportion of women employed in non-agricultural sectors
    • Indicator: Gender wage gap

Table: SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth Target 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities. Youth employment rate
Proportion of youth not in education, employment, or training (NEET)
SDG 4: Quality Education Target 4.4: By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs, and entrepreneurship. Proportion of youth and adults with information and communications technology (ICT) skills
Proportion of youth and adults with skills relevant to employment, decent jobs, and entrepreneurship
SDG 5: Gender Equality Target 5.1: End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere. Proportion of women employed in non-agricultural sectors
Gender wage gap

Analysis

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

The issues highlighted in the article are connected to SDG 8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth), SDG 4 (Quality Education), and SDG 5 (Gender Equality).

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

Based on the article’s content, the specific targets identified are:
– Target 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities.
– Target 4.4: By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs, and entrepreneurship.
– Target 5.1: End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

Yes, there are indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets. These indicators include:
– Youth employment rate
– Proportion of youth not in education, employment, or training (NEET)
– Proportion of youth and adults with information and communications technology (ICT) skills
– Proportion of youth and adults with skills relevant to employment, decent jobs, and entrepreneurship
– Proportion of women employed in non-agricultural sectors
– Gender wage gap

These indicators can be used to measure progress towards achieving full and productive employment, improving education and skills training, and promoting gender equality in the labor market.

Overall, the article highlights the need for India to address decent work deficits faced by youth, improve the quality of jobs, overcome labor market inequalities, enhance skills training and active labor market policies, bridge knowledge deficits on labor market patterns and youth employment, and tackle gender gaps in the labor market. The identified SDGs, targets, and indicators provide a framework for measuring progress and guiding policy interventions in these areas.

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: m.economictimes.com

 

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