3. GOOD HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

I Am Not an Alcoholic: ‘I made a two-week return visit to rehab’

I Am Not an Alcoholic: ‘I made a two-week return visit to rehab’
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

I Am Not an Alcoholic: ‘I made a two-week return visit to rehab’  The Irish Times

I Am Not an Alcoholic: ‘I made a two-week return visit to rehab’

The Stigma of Alcoholism: A Call for Change

The Disease of Alcoholism

The World Health Organisation (WHO) classifies alcoholism as a disease, as do doctors, nurses, psychologists, and all who work in the medical profession.

The Shame and Stigma

So why is it that people suffering from a dependence on alcohol are ashamed?

If I were diagnosed with cancer, I might keep it to myself, but not because of shame.

Many studies have shown alcohol to be more dangerous than cocaine and heroin, yet most parents don’t have a problem with their children drinking alcohol when they turn 18. Some parents even offer their children wine with their meals to try to teach them to drink responsibly. It is interesting that parents would be more upset if their children were taking cocaine or heroin than if they were drinking alcohol. Why is this?

The Legal Status of Alcohol

The answer: because alcohol is a legal substance.

The question: should it be?

The Lack of Support

A lot of my drinking was done alone, behind closed doors and in secret. Everybody wants me to drink but on their terms. If I have a dependency on alcohol and can’t stop when they stop, then I need to keep it to myself. Nobody wants to know.

With other illnesses, there is support from family, friends, and neighbors all wanting to help in whatever way they can. The number of home-made soups, casseroles, and apple tarts that find their way to the kitchen of the sick person would alleviate all symptoms if kindness was the prescription. They’re not to be seen when alcoholism is the illness. Most people can drink and stop when they know they have had enough. They assume those who continue to drink until they can no longer talk coherently or stand up are undisciplined and ought to pull themselves together. Very little sympathy there. Alcoholism may be classified as an illness by WHO, but it is only seen as an illness when the sick person is in recovery.

I have a difficulty calling it a disease, like I’m looking for an excuse for my lack of discipline.

The Need for Change

Imagine the following scenario:

“Are you not drinking?”

“No, I have a disease. I’m alcohol dependent,” I say clasping my glass of water.

I watch as slowly the crowd around me dwindles until I am left standing on my own. Not too much support there. And can you blame them? They look down at their glass and see the accusatory look: “Haven’t you had enough?” No, no one wants to question their own drinking.

Interestingly, if alcohol were invented today, it would not be legal to sell it. WHO would prohibit it because it is a harmful drug. Drinking! Our favorite pastime is bad for us! Think about that. No thank you, we’d prefer not.

A Journey to Recovery

I made a return visit to rehab. No, I did not relapse. Home life had become a little challenging as can happen, and my psychiatrist, perhaps thinking my sobriety might be threatened (18 months sober on the day I went in) felt I might benefit from a short stay. It ended up being two weeks.

Like the first time, the first two days were difficult. I felt flat and wasn’t able to interact with anyone. However, gradually, I settled down and as I got to know my fellow patients, I didn’t feel so alone. My own view on why I found going back in so hard was shame. I was embarrassed. Even though I hadn’t relapsed, I felt as if needing help was shameful. I should have been stronger.

I wasn’t going to write about this time in my life, but one or two patients assumed I was drinking again and in case word got out, I wanted to clarify this is not the case.

Overcoming Challenges

Social occasions are still hard because every occasion involves alcohol. I went to see a ballet and a group of us met for something

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

  • SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being
  • SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

  • SDG 3.5: Strengthen the prevention and treatment of substance abuse, including narcotic drug abuse and harmful use of alcohol.
  • SDG 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

  • Indicator for SDG 3.5: Number of people receiving treatment for substance abuse disorders.
  • Indicator for SDG 10.2: Proportion of population reporting discrimination or harassment based on alcohol dependency.

Table: SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Target 3.5: Strengthen the prevention and treatment of substance abuse, including narcotic drug abuse and harmful use of alcohol. Indicator: Number of people receiving treatment for substance abuse disorders.
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status. Indicator: Proportion of population reporting discrimination or harassment based on alcohol dependency.

The article addresses the issues of alcoholism and the stigma associated with it. These issues are connected to SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being, which aims to strengthen the prevention and treatment of substance abuse, including harmful use of alcohol (Target 3.5). The article highlights the need for support and treatment for individuals with alcohol dependency.

The article also touches on the issue of social inclusion and discrimination faced by individuals with alcohol dependency. This is relevant to SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities, which aims to promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all individuals, irrespective of their status. Target 10.2 specifically focuses on empowering and promoting the inclusion of individuals with alcohol dependency.

The indicators mentioned in the article include the number of people receiving treatment for substance abuse disorders, which can be used to measure progress towards Target 3.5 under SDG 3. Additionally, the proportion of the population reporting discrimination or harassment based on alcohol dependency can serve as an indicator for progress towards Target 10.2 under SDG 10.

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: irishtimes.com

 

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