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National Indian Child Welfare Association to Host a National Day of Prayer for Native Children on April 9th

National Indian Child Welfare Association to Host a National Day of Prayer for Native Children on April 9th
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

National Indian Child Welfare Association to Host a National Day of Prayer for Native Children on April 9th  Yahoo! Voices

National Indian Child Welfare Association Supports Native Children on National Day of Prayer

National Indian Child Welfare Association to Host a National Day of Prayer for Native Children on April 9th

In honor of National Child Abuse Prevention Month, on Tuesday, April 9, the National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA) is hosting a demonstration of support for Native children by joining in a National Day of Prayer for Native children.

Background

This National Day of Prayer coincides with the NICWA’s 42nd Annual Protecting Our Children Conference in Seattle. The conference is the premiere national event addressing tribal child welfare and the well-being of Native children.

Community Engagement

  • NCIWA is encouraging advocates for children to join in the National Day of Prayer by hosting a community event to demonstrate support for all Native children.
  • Over the month of April, NICWA will share resources promoting child safety as a collective community responsibility, with examples of reorienting tribal child welfare systems to stop the intergenerational transmission of trauma and support healing.

Importance of Community

“Our communities are a protective factor— what we call a natural safety net,” said NICWA Executive Director Sarah Kastelic. “As Native people, our extended families and connection to community and culture larger than ourselves are central elements of our mental health and well-being. Our communities are essential to preventing child abuse and neglect.”

Learn More

To learn more about the Protecting Our Children Conference, visit https://www.nicwa.org/conference/.

About the Author

“Native News Online is one of the most-read publications covering Indian Country and the news that matters to American Indians, Alaska Natives and other Indigenous people. Reach out to us at editor@nativenewsonline.net.”

Contact

Contact: news@nativenewsonline.net

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

  • SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions
  • SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being

The article discusses the National Indian Child Welfare Association’s demonstration of support for Native children and their focus on child safety and well-being. This aligns with SDG 16, which aims to promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all, and build effective, accountable, and inclusive institutions at all levels. Additionally, the article mentions the importance of mental health and well-being, which is a key aspect of SDG 3.

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

  • SDG 16.2: End abuse, exploitation, trafficking, and all forms of violence against and torture of children
  • SDG 3.4: By 2030, reduce by one-third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being

The article emphasizes the need to prevent child abuse and neglect, which relates to SDG 16.2. The National Indian Child Welfare Association aims to protect Native children from abuse and create a safe environment for them. Additionally, the focus on mental health and well-being aligns with SDG 3.4, which aims to promote mental health and well-being for all individuals.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

  • Number of reported cases of child abuse and neglect
  • Number of community events and demonstrations supporting Native children
  • Number of resources shared promoting child safety and trauma-informed care

The article mentions the National Indian Child Welfare Association’s efforts to raise awareness and promote child safety through community events and resource sharing. The number of reported cases of child abuse and neglect can be an indicator of progress towards SDG 16.2. Additionally, the number of community events and resources shared can indicate the level of support and awareness for Native children’s well-being.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions 16.2: End abuse, exploitation, trafficking, and all forms of violence against and torture of children – Number of reported cases of child abuse and neglect
– Number of community events and demonstrations supporting Native children
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being 3.4: By 2030, reduce by one-third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being – Number of resources shared promoting child safety and trauma-informed care
– Number of community events and demonstrations supporting Native children

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: yahoo.com

 

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