2. ZERO HUNGER

Rip Mason, Ag Resource Management’s CEO, Travels to Omaha for the 2024 Agricultural Federal Reserve Agricultural Economic Summit

Rip Mason, Ag Resource Management’s CEO, Travels to Omaha for the 2024 Agricultural Federal Reserve Agricultural Economic Summit
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Rip Mason, Ag Resource Management’s CEO, Travels to Omaha for the 2024 Agricultural Federal Reserve Agricultural …  Yahoo Finance

Rip Mason, Ag Resource Management’s CEO, Travels to Omaha for the 2024 Agricultural Federal Reserve Agricultural Economic Summit

Rip Mason

CEO - Ag Resource Management
CEO – Ag Resource Management

Fort Worth, Texas, May 14, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) —

Today, Ag Resource Management’s (ARM) Chief Executive Officer joins U.S. agricultural credit leaders, policymakers and regulators at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City’s National Economic Summit in Omaha, Nebraska.

“It’s been a difficult year for farmers due to recent decreases in net farm income caused by high input and land costs and relatively low commodity prices,” said Mason. “I am looking forward to exchanging ideas with other stakeholders in the farm economy about the economic outlook and tools available to support farmers.”

ARM offers farmers an alternative source of financing for annual operating loans that includes features such as a tailored farm budget and loan commitment based on crop value rather than equity in real estate and other assets.

“ARM can help farmers that may not fit traditional credit risk profiles,” said Mason.

ARM services borrowers through 23 storefronts in 18 states, representing approximately two million acres of annual crop production.

Attachment

CONTACT: Justin Shannon Ag Resource Management 16823485471 marketing@armlend.com

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

  1. SDG 1: No Poverty

    • Target 1.3: Implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable.
    • Indicator: Net farm income and its impact on poverty levels.
  2. SDG 2: Zero Hunger

    • Target 2.3: By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists, and fishers.
    • Indicator: Availability of alternative financing options for farmers.
  3. SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth

    • Target 8.10: Strengthen the capacity of domestic financial institutions to encourage and expand access to banking, insurance, and financial services for all.
    • Indicator: Number of storefronts and states served by Ag Resource Management (ARM).

Analysis

The article discusses the challenges faced by farmers due to high input and land costs and low commodity prices, highlighting the issue of poverty (SDG 1) in the agricultural sector. The CEO of Ag Resource Management (ARM) mentions that ARM offers an alternative source of financing for farmers who may not fit traditional credit risk profiles, addressing the need for financial inclusion and access to credit (SDG 8). Additionally, ARM’s services cover a significant amount of annual crop production, indicating their contribution to increasing agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers (SDG 2).

Based on the content of the article, the specific targets identified are:

  1. Target 1.3: Implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable.
  2. Target 2.3: By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists, and fishers.
  3. Target 8.10: Strengthen the capacity of domestic financial institutions to encourage and expand access to banking, insurance, and financial services for all.

The indicators mentioned or implied in the article are:

  • Net farm income and its impact on poverty levels: This indicator reflects progress towards Target 1.3 of reducing poverty in the agricultural sector.
  • Availability of alternative financing options for farmers: This indicator measures progress towards Target 2.3 of increasing agricultural productivity and incomes.
  • Number of storefronts and states served by ARM: This indicator assesses progress towards Target 8.10 of expanding access to financial services.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 1: No Poverty Target 1.3: Implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable. Net farm income and its impact on poverty levels.
SDG 2: Zero Hunger Target 2.3: By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists, and fishers. Availability of alternative financing options for farmers.
SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth Target 8.10: Strengthen the capacity of domestic financial institutions to encourage and expand access to banking, insurance, and financial services for all. Number of storefronts and states served by ARM.

Copyright: Dive into this article, curated with care by SDG Investors Inc. Our advanced AI technology searches through vast amounts of data to spotlight how we are all moving forward with the Sustainable Development Goals. While we own the rights to this content, we invite you to share it to help spread knowledge and spark action on the SDGs.

Fuente: finance.yahoo.com

 

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