3. GOOD HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

From bullying to respectful: Cleiton’s club ignites shift in gender perspectives among Mozambican boys

From bullying to respectful: Cleiton’s club ignites shift in gender perspectives among Mozambican boys
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

From bullying to respectful: Cleiton’s club ignites shift in gender …  African Business

From bullying to respectful: Cleiton’s club ignites shift in gender perspectives among Mozambican boys

UNFPA Project Promotes Gender Equality and Empowerment of Girls in Mozambique

UNFPA - East and Southern Africa

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Introduction

Just 14 years old, Cleiton Adriano has set himself an admirable goal. The ninth grader is holding awareness-raising activities with his peers to help create an inclusive space at his school in Beira, Sofala – one that is free of gender-based violence (GBV).

“Spreading positive messages about gender equality and the empowerment of girls has been one of my daily tasks at school,” said Cleiton. One of his greatest desires is to “become an agent of positive change in my community” – which he has almost certainly achieved.

He received training on GBV in August last year, as part of a UNFPA project to improve reproductive, maternal and adolescent health in Sofala province, with funds from the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA).

Training and Impact

Since early 2022, 14 members of the boys’ clubs have been trained as leaders to guide peer-to-peer discussions with 84 members who have been recruited to date. The training was conducted with technical support from the Provincial Directorates of Education and of Health.

Two boys who joined Cleiton’s club are Leonel and Benilton, both grade 10 students. Leonel recalled how he used to bully girls, especially his classmates at school, and how this had changed: “After joining the sessions, I realized my misconceptions and now aim to share positive information with both my classmates and community,” said Leonel.

When Benilton joined the sessions led by Cleiton, he made a decision to change his behaviour, which has made his parents proud of him. “The sessions not only changed my life, but thanks to them I identified and helped to report cases of gender-based violence in my community,” he said.

Engaging Men and Boys for Gender Equality

Almost weekly, groups of adolescent boys and young men aged 13 to 20, gather together to discuss topics ranging from sexuality, gender, early marriage and toxic masculinity, to create positive change in their communities. Their meetings are mostly held at secondary schools, which helps them attract more young people to attend.

Mozambique lags behind in many respects when it comes to gender equality. One in five women and girls aged 15 to 24 years believe that wife beating can be justified. More than 50 per cent of women were married before their 18th birthday (2006-2022), with many giving birth to children while still children themselves. The nation has a high adolescent birth rate of 180 births per 1000 girls aged 15 to 19 years (2023). In 2018, 16 per cent reported intimate partner violence in the past 12 months.

By involving boys and young men to respond to and lessen the incidence and impact of GBV in their schools, the project promotes women’s empowerment and contributes to positive change in male behaviour, attitudes and practices. Implemented by UNFPA’s partner, Consorzio Associazioni con il Mozambico (CAM), it has been launched in 14 schools in the districts of Beira, Dondo, Nhamatanda and Búzi.

Results and Impact

To date, the boys clubs’ have reached 434 adolescents and youth, using awareness sessions in their schools and communities.

“One of the great gains was to change the mentality of some parents and guardians who believed that their sons’ involvement in activities addressing gender-based violence and sexual and reproductive health would compromise their masculinity,” said Cremilda Gravata, one of the 14 teachers trained on GBV under the KOICA project. She supports the boys’ club at her secondary school.

“By disseminating messages about preventing and combating gender-based violence and sexual and reproductive health and rights, boys have been creating effective behavioural change within the school,” Ms. Gravata said.

Adriano Cerveja, from Sofala’s Provincial Directorate of Education, supports the view that boys have played a crucial role in reporting gender-based violence, bullying and harmful practices. They have also referred adolescents to youth-friendly health services for family planning and other health-related support, information and counselling.

Conclusion

Since 2022, the KOICA-funded multi-year project is enabling boys like Cleiton to educate and inspire their peers to challenge stereotypes regarding masculinity and risk-taking behaviour, and to reinforce their role in advancing women’s rights and gender equality.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of UNFPA – East and Southern Africa.

This Press Release has been issued by APO. The content is not monitored by the editorial team of African Business and not of the content has been checked or validated by our editorial teams, proof readers or fact checkers. The issuer is solely responsible for the content of this announcement.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

  1. SDG 5: Gender Equality

    • Target 5.1: End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere
    • Target 5.2: Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation
    • Target 5.3: Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation
    • Target 5.4: Recognize and value unpaid care and domestic work through the provision of public services, infrastructure and social protection policies and the promotion of shared responsibility within the household and the family
    • Target 5.5: Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life
    • Target 5.6: Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences
    • Target 5.A: Undertake reforms to give women equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to ownership and control over land and other forms of property, financial services, inheritance and natural resources, in accordance with national laws
    • Target 5.B: Enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology, to promote the empowerment of women
    • Target 5.C: Adopt and strengthen sound policies and enforceable legislation for the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls at all levels
  2. SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being

    • Target 3.1: By 2030, reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births
    • Target 3.7: By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programmes
    • Target 3.7.1: By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programmes
  3. SDG 4: Quality Education

    • Target 4.7: By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development

Table: SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 5: Gender Equality Target 5.2: Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation Indicator not mentioned in the article
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being Target 3.7: By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programmes Indicator not mentioned in the article
SDG 4: Quality Education Target 4.7: By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development Indicator not mentioned in the article

Analysis

The article addresses issues related to gender-based violence (GBV) and the empowerment of girls in schools. Based on the content of the article, the following SDGs, targets, and indicators can be identified:

SDG 5: Gender Equality

The article highlights efforts to create an inclusive space free of gender-based violence in schools. This aligns with SDG 5, which aims to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.

Target 5.2: Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation

The article emphasizes the importance of addressing gender-based violence and changing harmful behaviors and attitudes towards girls. By promoting awareness and education, the project aims to eliminate violence against women and girls.

SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being

The article mentions the project’s focus on improving reproductive, maternal, and adolescent health. This aligns with SDG 3, which aims to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages.

Target 3.7: By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programmes

The project’s training on gender-based violence and reproductive health contributes to the target of ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including education and information.

SDG 4: Quality Education

The article mentions the boys’ clubs’ engagement in discussions on topics such as gender, early marriage, and toxic masculinity. This aligns with SDG 4, which aims to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.

Target 4.7: By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development

The boys’ clubs’ focus on challenging stereotypes regarding masculinity and promoting gender equality contributes to the target of acquiring knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development.

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: african.business

 

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