2. ZERO HUNGER

Act in place, but no rules: For sale, agricultural land in Goa – Times of India

Act in place, but no rules: For sale, agricultural land in Goa – Times of India
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

Act in place, but no rules: For sale, agricultural land in Goa  Times of India

Act in place, but no rules: For sale, agricultural land in Goa – Times of India

Sale of Agricultural Land to Non-Agriculturists Remains Unaddressed in Goa

The sale of agricultural land to non-agriculturists in the state of Goa has not been resolved even six months after the Goa Restrictions on Transfer of Agricultural Land Act, 2023, was passed by the assembly. The government has yet to notify the rules of the Act.

A circular issued by the registration department states that until the rules are notified, sub-registrars cannot refuse registration of any land mentioned in the Act, nor can they demand proof of being an agriculturist from any buyer. This is because they are not empowered to do so under the Registration Act, 1908, or the above-mentioned Act.

In case any suspicious transactions are detected, the registered deeds may be referred to the respective collector for necessary action.

Prohibition on Transfer of Agricultural Land to Non-Agriculturists

The Goa Restrictions on Transfer of Agricultural Land Act, 2023, prohibits the transfer of agricultural land to non-agriculturists, except in specific circumstances. These circumstances include industries, cooperative farming societies, and non-agriculturists who intend to buy agricultural land for farming purposes.

  1. No person who owns or occupies or is in possession of agricultural land shall transfer such land to a person other than an agriculturist, by way of sale, gift, exchange, lease, or any other mode of transfer.
  2. Farmers cannot sell agricultural land to non-agriculturists unless permission is granted by the concerned collector.
  3. Permission may be granted in special circumstances, such as when an industrial or commercial undertaking requires land for agriculture in connection with its operations.
  4. The land can also be transferred if it is required by a cooperative farming society.
  5. If a non-agriculturist intends to take up agriculture and is capable of cultivating the land personally, the collector may consider permitting the transfer.
  6. If a person intending to take up agriculture acquires the land, they will be responsible for sustaining farming on the land.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are relevant to this issue as they promote sustainable agriculture and responsible land use. SDG 2 aims to end hunger, achieve food security, improve nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture. SDG 15 focuses on protecting, restoring, and promoting sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, including land. By implementing regulations that restrict the transfer of agricultural land to non-agriculturists, Goa is taking steps towards achieving these SDGs.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 2: Zero Hunger Target 2.3: By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists, and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets, and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment. Indicator 2.3.1: Volume of production per labor unit by classes of farming/pastoral/forestry enterprise size
SDG 15: Life on Land Target 15.3: By 2030, combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil, including land affected by desertification, drought, and floods, and strive to achieve a land degradation-neutral world. Indicator 15.3.1: Proportion of land that is degraded over total land area
SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions Target 16.6: Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels. Indicator 16.6.1: Primary government expenditures as a proportion of original approved budget, by sector (or by budget codes or similar)

Analysis

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

The issues highlighted in the article are connected to SDG 2: Zero Hunger, SDG 15: Life on Land, and SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions.

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

Based on the article’s content, the specific targets that can be identified are:

– Target 2.3: By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers.

– Target 15.3: By 2030, combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil.

– Target 16.6: Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

Yes, there are indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets:

– Indicator 2.3.1: Volume of production per labor unit by classes of farming/pastoral/forestry enterprise size (related to Target 2.3)

– Indicator 15.3.1: Proportion of land that is degraded over total land area (related to Target 15.3)

– Indicator 16.6.1: Primary government expenditures as a proportion of original approved budget, by sector (or by budget codes or similar) (related to Target 16.6)

The article discusses the sale of agricultural land to non-agriculturists, which can impact agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers (Target 2.3). It also mentions the need to protect agricultural land from being transferred to non-agriculturists and the requirement for permission from the collector in special circumstances, which relates to combatting desertification and restoring degraded land (Target 15.3). Additionally, the article highlights the need for effective and transparent institutions, as the government is yet to notify the rules of the Act (Target 16.6).

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 2: Zero Hunger Target 2.3: By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists, and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets, and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment. Indicator 2.3.1: Volume of production per labor unit by classes of farming/pastoral/forestry enterprise size
SDG 15: Life on Land Target 15.3: By 2030, combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil, including land affected by desertification, drought, and floods, and strive to achieve a land degradation-neutral world. Indicator 15.3.1: Proportion of land that is degraded over total land area
SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions Target 16.6: Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels. Indicator 16.6.1: Primary government expenditures as a proportion of original approved budget, by sector (or by budget codes or similar)

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: m.timesofindia.com

 

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