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Dorothy Roberts Lays Out a Damning Exposé of Medical Racism and “Child Welfare”

Dorothy Roberts Lays Out a Damning Exposé of Medical Racism and “Child Welfare”
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

Dorothy Roberts Lays Out a Damning Exposé of Medical Racism and “Child Welfare”  Truthout

Dorothy Roberts Lays Out a Damning Exposé of Medical Racism and “Child Welfare”

Part of the Series

The Road to Abolition

Introduction

There is an old saying that “when white folks catch a cold, Black folks get pneumonia.” That saying speaks to a fundamental truth about the U.S.: Black people are positioned to catch hell because of historical and contemporary systemic forms of inequality.

Interview with Dorothy Roberts

In this interview, scholar Dorothy Roberts discusses the history of white racist mythmaking regarding the “sub-humanity” of Black women and how these myths have manifested in various aspects of their lives. Roberts emphasizes the need for hope and a commitment to abolition in order to create a more caring and humane world.

The Impact of Racist Myths

Roberts highlights the devastating implications of racist myths on the stability of Black family life, including the ways in which child welfare and foster care systems police and victimize Black families. These myths depict Black women as “pathology,” deflecting attention away from structural inequality and perpetuating carceral approaches to meet human needs.

Demythologizing Black Women

Roberts emphasizes the importance of understanding the function of these myths in U.S. society and their connection to racial capitalism and white supremacy. She argues that dispelling these myths must be connected to movements to end racial capitalism and white supremacy, and highlights the historical resistance of Black women against disparaging mythology.

Racial Biases in Medicine

Roberts discusses the persistence of the biological concept of race in science and medicine, which continues to be used to enforce racial hierarchies. She highlights the racial biases present in medical practices, such as race correction in diagnostic tools and the undertreatment of Black patients for pain. These biases contribute to the devaluation of Black women’s experiences and their mistreatment within the healthcare system.

The Need for Abolition

Roberts argues for the abolition of the child welfare system and its replacement with a radically different approach to supporting families and keeping children safe. She emphasizes that the current system is designed to oppress marginalized families and perpetuate racial hierarchies. Roberts draws on historical examples of community-based care and mutual aid as alternatives to the carceral system.

Maintaining Hope in Abolition

Roberts acknowledges the historical resilience of anti-Black racism and white supremacy, but emphasizes the importance of practicing hope as a discipline. She rejects false idealism about American equality and instead advocates for an abolitionist approach grounded in facing the reality of systemic oppression and working towards a more caring and humane world.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

  • SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being
  • SDG 5: Gender Equality
  • SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities
  • SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

  • SDG 3.1: By 2030, reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births.
  • SDG 3.7: By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programs.
  • SDG 5.1: End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere.
  • SDG 5.2: Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation.
  • SDG 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status.
  • SDG 16.3: Promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and ensure equal access to justice for all.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

  • Indicator for SDG 3.1: Maternal mortality ratio
  • Indicator for SDG 3.7: Proportion of women of reproductive age (15-49 years) who have their need for family planning satisfied with modern methods
  • Indicator for SDG 5.1: Proportion of women aged 15-49 years who make their own informed decisions regarding sexual relations, contraceptive use, and reproductive health care
  • Indicator for SDG 5.2: Proportion of women and girls subjected to sexual violence by persons other than an intimate partner in the previous 12 months
  • Indicator for SDG 10.2: Proportion of people who feel safe walking alone around the area they live
  • Indicator for SDG 16.3: Proportion of victims of violence in the previous 12 months who reported their victimization to competent authorities or other officially recognized mechanisms

Table: SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being 3.1: By 2030, reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births. Maternal mortality ratio
SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being 3.7: By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programs. Proportion of women of reproductive age (15-49 years) who have their need for family planning satisfied with modern methods
SDG 5: Gender Equality 5.1: End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere. Proportion of women aged 15-49 years who make their own informed decisions regarding sexual relations, contraceptive use, and reproductive health care
SDG 5: Gender Equality 5.2: Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation. Proportion of women and girls subjected to sexual violence by persons other than an intimate partner in the previous 12 months
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status. Proportion of people who feel safe walking alone around the area they live
SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions 16.3: Promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and ensure equal access to justice for all. Proportion of victims of violence in the previous 12 months who reported their victimization to competent authorities or other officially recognized mechanisms

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: truthout.org

 

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