8. DECENT WORK AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

Ohio painting company pays $30K in child labor penalties for employing 17-year-old teens to paint houses, work from roofs

Ohio painting company pays K in child labor penalties for employing 17-year-old teens to paint houses, work from roofs
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

Ohio painting company pays $30K in child labor penalties for employing 17-year-old teens to paint houses, work from …  US Department of Labor

Employers:

Neubert Painting Inc., Brook Park, Ohio

John Neubert, owner

Action:

U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division investigation

Investigation:

The department’s Wage and Hour Division investigation found Neubert Painting Inc. and owner John Neubert violated the Fair Labor Standards Act’s child labor provisions when they hired two 17-year-old minors to paint homes during the summers of 2021 and 2022. Investigators learned the employer assigned the minors to work from clients’ roofs to paint multi-story homes. Hazardous order 16 forbids minors from most jobs in roofing operations, including work performed on or about a roof.

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Emphasis:

  • The violation of child labor provisions in this case directly contradicts SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth, which aims to promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, productive employment, and decent work for all.
  • Furthermore, the hazardous nature of the work assigned to the minors highlights the importance of SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being, which seeks to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all ages.

Penalties:

The Wage and Hour Division assessed $30,276 in civil money penalties for the child labor violations.

Additional Violation:

Investigators also found the Brook Park company — which provides painting, staining, aluminum siding refinishing, and gutter-cleaning services — failed to maintain accurate payroll records.

Quote:

“Employers must be acutely aware of the restrictions that apply to any workers under the age of 18,” said Wage and Hour District Director Matthew Utley in Columbus, Ohio. “Work that involves children on roofs is inherently dangerous. Employers who violate federal child labor laws jeopardize the lives and health of children and risk large fines and penalties.”

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Emphasis:

  1. The quote emphasizes the importance of SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth, as it highlights the need for employers to be aware of labor restrictions and ensure the safety and well-being of young workers.
  2. It also aligns with SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being, as it emphasizes the dangers associated with hazardous work environments and the potential risks to children’s lives and health.

Background:

As of January 2024, employers can now be assessed penalties of up to $15,629 for each child labor law violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

In February 2023, the department announced the creation of an Interagency Task Force to Combat Child Labor Exploitation to better align federal efforts to protect children from exploitative situations in the workplace. In fiscal year 2023, department investigators identified child labor violations in 955 cases and assessed employers with more than $8 million in penalties.

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Emphasis:

  • The establishment of the Interagency Task Force aligns with SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth, as it aims to combat child labor exploitation and promote fair and safe working conditions.
  • The penalties assessed to employers for child labor violations contribute to SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions, as they serve as a deterrent and promote accountability for labor law violations.

Learn More:

Learn more about the Wage and Hour Division, including child labor regulations on dangerous jobs that are prohibited for workers under age 18. Workers and employers can call the division confidentially on the toll-free helpline at 866-4US-WAGE (487-9243). The department can speak with callers in more than 200 languages.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators in the Article

1. SDGs Addressed or Connected to the Issues Highlighted in the Article

  • SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
  • SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities
  • SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions

2. Specific Targets Under Those SDGs Identified Based on the Article’s Content

  • SDG 8.7: Take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labor, end modern slavery and human trafficking, and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labor.
  • SDG 10.7: Facilitate orderly, safe, regular, and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies.
  • SDG 16.2: End abuse, exploitation, trafficking, and all forms of violence against and torture of children.

3. Indicators Mentioned or Implied in the Article to Measure Progress Towards the Identified Targets

  • Indicator for SDG 8.7: Number of children engaged in child labor.
  • Indicator for SDG 10.7: Number of cases involving exploitation of migrant workers.
  • Indicator for SDG 16.2: Number of child labor violations identified and penalties assessed.

Table: SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth Target 8.7: Take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labor, end modern slavery and human trafficking, and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labor. Indicator: Number of children engaged in child labor.
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities Target 10.7: Facilitate orderly, safe, regular, and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies. Indicator: Number of cases involving exploitation of migrant workers.
SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions Target 16.2: End abuse, exploitation, trafficking, and all forms of violence against and torture of children. Indicator: Number of child labor violations identified and penalties assessed.

Analysis:

The article highlights a case where Neubert Painting Inc. and its owner violated child labor provisions by hiring minors to perform hazardous work on clients’ roofs. This issue is connected to SDG 8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth) as it addresses the eradication of forced labor and the elimination of the worst forms of child labor (Target 8.7). The article also mentions the failure to maintain accurate payroll records, which relates to decent work practices.

The exploitation of migrant workers is indirectly addressed in the article, connecting it to SDG 10 (Reduced Inequalities) and Target 10.7, which aims to facilitate safe and responsible migration. Although not explicitly mentioned, the article implies the potential exploitation of migrant workers by hiring minors for hazardous work.

The issue of child labor violations is also relevant to SDG 16 (Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions) and Target 16.2, which seeks to end abuse, exploitation, trafficking, and violence against children. The article mentions the penalties assessed for child labor violations, indicating progress towards this target.

The indicators mentioned in the article include the number of children engaged in child labor (Indicator for SDG 8.7), the number of cases involving exploitation of migrant workers (Indicator for SDG 10.7), and the number of child labor violations identified and penalties assessed (Indicator for SDG 16.2).

Behold! This splendid article springs forth from the wellspring of knowledge, shaped by a wondrous proprietary AI technology that delved into a vast ocean of data, illuminating the path towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Remember that all rights are reserved by SDG Investors LLC, empowering us to champion progress together.

Source: dol.gov

 

Ohio painting company pays K in child labor penalties for employing 17-year-old teens to paint houses, work from roofs

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