10. REDUCED INEQUALITIES

HR’s next big challenge: Ageism in the workplace

HR’s next big challenge: Ageism in the workplace
Written by ZJbTFBGJ2T

How HR can confront ageism in the workplace  Human Resource Executive®

HR’s next big challenge: Ageism in the workplace

The Impact of Ageism in the Workplace on Older Workers

As the U.S. workforce diversifies in age, HR leaders are challenged to create policies and practices that appeal to five highly distinct generations. One segment in particular—older workers—will be increasingly represented in the workforce in the coming years. Yet, recent research has found that many employers are not offering environments conducive to recruiting or retaining these professionals. Without strategic planning now, they say, systemic ageism in the workplace could cause employers to miss out on the potential of this growing population of workers.

The Growing Presence of Older Workers

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, those over age 65 will comprise about 8.6% of the U.S. labor force by 2032—up from 6.6% in 2022, accounting for nearly 60% of the overall growth of the labor force during this timeframe. Two years ago, about 19% of Americans age 65 and over were working, a figure that the BLS expects to jump to 21% in the coming years; labor force participation rates are expected to flatline or drop for all other age groups, except the 55-to-64-year-old population.

The Benefits of Hiring Older Workers

Experienced workers bring a wealth of knowledge, institutional memory, and proven skills to the table. Studies show age-diverse teams are more innovative and productive. Their employment can be a boon for organizations, particularly in a tight labor market.

The Challenges and Biases Faced by Older Workers

However, many employers are not prepared to take advantage of these opportunities. Research has found that age bias against older workers is prevalent in the hiring process. Concerns about retirement proximity, potential health issues, and lack of technology experience contribute to this bias. Age discrimination leads to a loss of talent, decreased employee morale, and potential lawsuits.

Addressing Age Bias in the Workplace

Organizations need to proactively address age bias in the workplace. Training to eliminate bias, demographic audits, and knowledge-transfer programs are common strategies. Creating lasting relationships with older workers through phased retirement options, part-time work, and alumni networks can also be effective. Employers should also listen to what older workers want and tailor talent practices accordingly. Skills-based hiring can help older workers showcase their abilities and overcome age-related biases.

The Role of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Addressing ageism in the workplace aligns with several Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including:

  1. SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
  2. SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities
  3. SDG 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions

Conclusion

Ageism in the workplace is a significant issue that needs to be addressed to fully harness the potential of older workers. By implementing strategies to eliminate age bias and create inclusive environments, organizations can benefit from the knowledge and skills that older workers bring. This not only aligns with the SDGs but also contributes to a more diverse and productive workforce.

SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth Target 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value. – Percentage of older workers in the labor force
– Labor force participation rates for different age groups
– Workplace policies and practices that promote the recruitment and retention of older workers
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status. – Percentage of hiring managers considering age when reviewing resumes
– Percentage of hiring managers with bias against senior candidates
– Percentage of older workers experiencing ageism in the workplace
SDG 5: Gender Equality Target 5.1: End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere. – Percentage of hiring managers with bias against senior candidates based on proximity to retirement
– Percentage of hiring managers with bias against older workers due to potential health issues

1. Which SDGs are addressed or connected to the issues highlighted in the article?

SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth

The article discusses the challenges faced by HR leaders in creating policies and practices that appeal to older workers, who will be increasingly represented in the workforce. It highlights the potential of older workers to contribute to organizations and emphasizes the need for strategic planning to avoid ageism in the workplace.

SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities

The article addresses ageism in the workplace and the discrimination faced by older workers. It discusses biases against senior candidates and the experiences of older workers who have been targeted for layoffs or ignored by leadership. It emphasizes the importance of empowering and promoting the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age.

SDG 5: Gender Equality

The article mentions that hiring managers consider age when reviewing resumes and exhibit bias against senior candidates. It highlights concerns about potential health issues and lack of technology experience among older workers. While not explicitly gender-related, these biases can contribute to inequalities faced by older workers, including older women.

2. What specific targets under those SDGs can be identified based on the article’s content?

Target 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value.

This target is relevant as it emphasizes the need to achieve full and productive employment for all, including older workers. The article discusses the potential of older workers and the importance of creating environments conducive to recruiting and retaining them.

Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status.

This target is relevant as it calls for the promotion of social and economic inclusion of all individuals, irrespective of age. The article highlights ageism in the workplace and the need to address biases against older workers.

3. Are there any indicators mentioned or implied in the article that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets?

The article mentions several indicators that can be used to measure progress towards the identified targets:

  • Percentage of older workers in the labor force: This indicator can measure the representation of older workers in the workforce and their inclusion in employment.
  • Labor force participation rates for different age groups: This indicator can assess the participation rates of different age groups in the labor force, including older workers.
  • Workplace policies and practices that promote the recruitment and retention of older workers: This indicator can measure the existence and effectiveness of policies and practices that support the inclusion of older workers in the workforce.
  • Percentage of hiring managers considering age when reviewing resumes: This indicator can assess the extent of age bias in the hiring process.
  • Percentage of hiring managers with bias against senior candidates: This indicator can measure the prevalence of bias against senior candidates in hiring decisions.
  • Percentage of older workers experiencing ageism in the workplace: This indicator can measure the extent of age discrimination faced by older workers.

4. SDGs, Targets, and Indicators

SDGs Targets Indicators
SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth Target 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value. – Percentage of older workers in the labor force
– Labor force participation rates for different age groups
– Workplace policies and practices that promote the recruitment and retention of older workers
SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities Target 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status. – Percentage of hiring managers considering age when reviewing resumes
– Percentage of hiring managers with bias against senior candidates
– Percentage of older workers experiencing ageism in the workplace
SDG 5: Gender Equality Target 5.1: End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere. – Percentage of hiring managers with bias against senior candidates based on proximity to retirement
– Percentage of hiring managers with bias against older workers due to potential health issues

Copyright: Dive into this article, curated with care by SDG Investors Inc. Our advanced AI technology searches through vast amounts of data to spotlight how we are all moving forward with the Sustainable Development Goals. While we own the rights to this content, we invite you to share it to help spread knowledge and spark action on the SDGs.

Fuente: hrexecutive.com

 

Join us, as fellow seekers of change, on a transformative journey at https://sdgtalks.ai/welcome, where you can become a member and actively contribute to shaping a brighter future.

 

About the author

ZJbTFBGJ2T

Leave a Comment